Genesis 43:6 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 43:6, NIV: "Israel asked, 'Why did you bring this trouble on me by telling the man you had another brother?'"

Genesis 43:6, ESV: "Israel said, “Why did you treat me so badly as to tell the man that you had another brother?”"

Genesis 43:6, KJV: "And Israel said, Wherefore dealt ye so ill with me, as to tell the man whether ye had yet a brother?"

Genesis 43:6, NASB: "Then Israel said, 'Why did you treat me so badly, by telling the man whether you still had another brother?'"

Genesis 43:6, NLT: "'Why were you so cruel to me?' Jacob moaned. 'Why did you tell him you had another brother?'"

Genesis 43:6, CSB: ""Why have you caused me so much trouble? " Israel asked. "Why did you tell the man that you had another brother? ""

What does Genesis 43:6 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Israel is the name God gave to Jacob (Genesis 35:10). When famine struck, Jacob instructed ten of his sons to buy food in Egypt (Genesis 42:1–2). That resulted in one being held in captivity (Genesis 42:24) while the rest were commanded to return only with their youngest brother, Benjamin, as proof they were not lying (Genesis 42:19–20). Jacob initially refused this, electing to abandon Simeon rather than risk his favorite son (Genesis 42:38). But the famine has continued, and Jacob has once again told his sons to go buy food (Genesis 43:1–2).

Taking a strong stand against his father, Judah has refused to go without taking Benjamin. So far as they've been told, trying to enter Egypt without the youngest brother would only end in prison or death (Genesis 43:3–5).

Incredibly, Jacob remains unresolved. He once again blames his older sons for his plight instead of acting decisively (Genesis 43:10). His complaint is that they should never have told the Egyptian governor about Benjamin, who was not sent on the first mission. He depicts their conversation with the governor as an act of malice or mistreatment. Even in old age, Jacob continues to demonstrate a spirit of fear and self-pity (Genesis 31:31; 32:7; 34:30), something he takes out on his sons.

Still, God will remain faithful to Jacob, as He has always done. Jacob does not yet know that the Egyptian governor is his long-lost son, Joseph (Genesis 42:8), and all of this is a prelude to a happy reunion (Genesis 47:11–12).