Genesis 33:11 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 33:11, NIV: "Please accept the present that was brought to you, for God has been gracious to me and I have all I need.' And because Jacob insisted, Esau accepted it."

Genesis 33:11, ESV: "Please accept my blessing that is brought to you, because God has dealt graciously with me, and because I have enough.” Thus he urged him, and he took it."

Genesis 33:11, KJV: "Take, I pray thee, my blessing that is brought to thee; because God hath dealt graciously with me, and because I have enough. And he urged him, and he took it."

Genesis 33:11, NASB: "Please accept my gift which has been brought to you, because God has dealt graciously with me and because I have plenty.' So he urged him, and he accepted it."

Genesis 33:11, NLT: "Please take this gift I have brought you, for God has been very gracious to me. I have more than enough.' And because Jacob insisted, Esau finally accepted the gift."

Genesis 33:11, CSB: "Please take my present that was brought to you, because God has been gracious to me and I have everything I need." So Jacob urged him until he accepted."

What does Genesis 33:11 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Jacob continues to urge his brother Esau to accept his large gift of livestock (Genesis 32:13–17). At the time, that offering was partly motivated by fear that Esau was still committed to revenge (Genesis 27:41–45; 32:6–8). As it turned out, Esau was happy to be reunited with his estranged brother (Genesis 33:4).

In the prior verse Jacob referred to his gift of livestock to Esau as min'hāt 'ani, meaning "my gift." Now, as he presses Esau to accept it, he calls it bir'kāt 'ani, meaning "my blessing." This might mean Jacob intends this as partial restitution for stealing their father's blessing twenty years ago (Genesis 27:19–29). He has been blessed by God and wants Esau to share in at least part of this prosperity.

Jacob also mirrors Esau's language, saying he has enough because God has dealt graciously with him. Jacob credits God with his success and his ability to give generously a portion of what he has acquired to his brother.

In that era, it might have been common to make a show of refusal and insistence when giving gifts. However, it's also possible that Jacob wasn't sure he could really trust Esau's forgiveness unless Esau accepted Jacob's gift. Esau's agreement to take the gift would put an obligation on his honor, making it very difficult for him to justify any later violence against his brother.