Genesis 13:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 13:9, NIV: "Is not the whole land before you? Let's part company. If you go to the left, I'll go to the right; if you go to the right, I'll go to the left.'"

Genesis 13:9, ESV: "Is not the whole land before you? Separate yourself from me. If you take the left hand, then I will go to the right, or if you take the right hand, then I will go to the left.”"

Genesis 13:9, KJV: "Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me: if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right; or if thou depart to the right hand, then I will go to the left."

Genesis 13:9, NASB: "Is the entire land not before you? Please separate from me; if you choose the left, then I will go to the right; or if you choose the right, then I will go to the left.'"

Genesis 13:9, NLT: "The whole countryside is open to you. Take your choice of any section of the land you want, and we will separate. If you want the land to the left, then I'll take the land on the right. If you prefer the land on the right, then I'll go to the left.'"

Genesis 13:9, CSB: "Isn't the whole land before you? Separate from me: if you go to the left, I will go to the right; if you go to the right, I will go to the left.""

What does Genesis 13:9 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Abram is proposing a solution to end the quarreling between his herdsmen and Lot's herdsmen. The reason for the budding feud was due to the limited space available for both of their large herds of animals. According to this passage, God has blessed Abram and his family abundantly, and this includes Lot (Genesis 13:5–6). Even the richest landscape can only support so many men and animals. To keep the ever-growing families from bickering over resources, Abram suggests that they split up and settle in separate regions.

To ensure that there is no reason for Lot or Lot's servants to claim that Abram has taken the best land for himself, Abram generously gives Lot the choice of which parcel of land to occupy. This is a remarkably humble gesture on the part of Abram. As the elder, he would have had the right of first choice. Granting this advantage to Lot is not only generous, it reinforces the unique fondness Abram seems to have for his nephew. The following verses reveal Lot's self-serving choice, which will prove to be quite fateful.