Genesis 13:10 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 13:10, NIV: "Lot looked around and saw that the whole plain of the Jordan toward Zoar was well watered, like the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt. (This was before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah.)"

Genesis 13:10, ESV: "And Lot lifted up his eyes and saw that the Jordan Valley was well watered everywhere like the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, in the direction of Zoar. (This was before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah.)"

Genesis 13:10, KJV: "And Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of Jordan, that it was well watered every where, before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, even as the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, as thou comest unto Zoar."

Genesis 13:10, NASB: "Lot raised his eyes and saw all the vicinity of the Jordan, that it was well watered everywhere—this was before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah—like the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt going toward Zoar."

Genesis 13:10, NLT: "Lot took a long look at the fertile plains of the Jordan Valley in the direction of Zoar. The whole area was well watered everywhere, like the garden of the LORD or the beautiful land of Egypt. (This was before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah.)"

Genesis 13:10, CSB: "Lot looked out and saw that the entire plain of the Jordan as far as Zoar was well watered everywhere like the LORD's garden and the land of Egypt. (This was before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah.)"

What does Genesis 13:10 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Abram's and Lot's large herds of animals made it impossible for them to continue to occupy the same area. Abram has suggested they split up and settle in different parts of the land around Bethel. Rather than insisting on his right, as the patriarch, to choose his own territory, Abram gives his nephew Lot the first choice of what land to claim.

Lot surveyed the land. It was clear the Jordan valley was a lush, fruitful region. As Abram and company had learned during the famine described in the previous chapter, access to water was essential in this land. The region Lot would choose had abundant water resources. The text describes the area as being like the garden of the Lord—a reference to Eden—and like the land of Egypt around the Nile.

Ominously, though, the writer points out that this was before the Lord destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, foreshadowing events that would come later in the book (Genesis 19). At this time, the reputation of these two cities was clearly established (Genesis 13:13). This means Lot's choice involves two aspects: personal gain and spiritual risk. Sadly, for Lot, the decision to move near to Sodom will lead to a life inside of Sodom, and the loss of virtually all he has (Genesis 19).