Exodus 2:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Exodus 2:9, NIV: "Pharaoh's daughter said to her, 'Take this baby and nurse him for me, and I will pay you.' So the woman took the baby and nursed him."

Exodus 2:9, ESV: "And Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, “Take this child away and nurse him for me, and I will give you your wages.” So the woman took the child and nursed him."

Exodus 2:9, KJV: "And Pharaoh's daughter said unto her, Take this child away, and nurse it for me, and I will give thee thy wages. And the woman took the child, and nursed it."

Exodus 2:9, NASB: "Then Pharaoh’s daughter said to her, 'Take this child away and nurse him for me, and I will give you your wages.' So the woman took the child and nursed him."

Exodus 2:9, NLT: "'Take this baby and nurse him for me,' the princess told the baby's mother. 'I will pay you for your help.' So the woman took her baby home and nursed him."

Exodus 2:9, CSB: "Then Pharaoh's daughter said to her, "Take this child and nurse him for me, and I will pay your wages." So the woman took the boy and nursed him."

What does Exodus 2:9 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Pharaoh has ordered the death of all Hebrew boys (Exodus 1:22), an order defied by Moses' mother, who instead hides him in a basket (Exodus 2:2–3). In an interesting twist, the Pharaoh's own daughter discovers the baby and feels compassion (Exodus 2:6). She speaks to the mother of Moses, and arranges for him to be weaned and brought back to her. Instead of Moses dying in the Nile River, he is rescued, adopted, and placed into the care of his own birth mother. Further, Moses' family is even compensated for their work! This was especially significant since the Jews were already slaves under Egyptian control. Pharaoh's daughter could have forced the job upon her, but instead showed favor to the mother of Moses. The entire scene reveals God's divine work during a dark time in the history of the Jewish people.

As expected, we are told, "The woman took the child and nursed him." The mother of Moses cared for him until the time he was weaned and could eat solid food. This would have been at least a year. Many children in ancient cultures were nursed until two or even three years old. The most formative time of Moses' early life remained in the arms of his own mother during a time when baby boys his age had not even been allowed to live.