Ephesians 4:26 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Ephesians 4:26, NIV: In your anger do not sin': Do not let the sun go down while you are still angry,

Ephesians 4:26, ESV: Be angry and do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger,

Ephesians 4:26, KJV: Be ye angry, and sin not: let not the sun go down upon your wrath:

Ephesians 4:26, NASB: BE ANGRY, AND yet do not sin; do not let the sun go down on your anger,

Ephesians 4:26, NLT: And 'don't sin by letting anger control you.' Don't let the sun go down while you are still angry,

Ephesians 4:26, CSB: Be angry and do not sin. Don't let the sun go down on your anger,

What does Ephesians 4:26 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

The list of practical commands Paul began in verse 25 continues by tackling the topic of anger. Two principles are given. First, Paul teaches that anger is not necessarily wrong. Anger itself is not a sin; there are some things Christians ought to be angry about. God expresses anger (Exodus 4:14). Jesus showed controlled anger in turning over the tables of the tax collectors (John 2:13–17). However, uncontrolled anger quickly leads to doing wrong. Being angry is not an excuse to sin. Self–control is required to channel anger in a God–honoring way.

One way to control anger is given by Paul in his second command: don't let anger sit unresolved. The focus is not on the literal sunset, as if there's a certain time of day when all aggravations have to be ignored. Rather, the point is not to let time go by before dealing with anger. Believers are to make dealing with anger a priority. Otherwise, bitterness or the desire for vengeance can grow, leading to more sinful thoughts and actions. Anger can be a helpful emotion, yet must be handled carefully and quickly to avoid leading to sin. It is not meant to be "lived in," only "dealt with."