Ephesians 2:14 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Ephesians 2:14, NIV: "For he himself is our peace, who has made the two groups one and has destroyed the barrier, the dividing wall of hostility,"

Ephesians 2:14, ESV: "For he himself is our peace, who has made us both one and has broken down in his flesh the dividing wall of hostility"

Ephesians 2:14, KJV: "For he is our peace, who hath made both one, and hath broken down the middle wall of partition between us;"

Ephesians 2:14, NASB: "For He Himself is our peace, who made both groups into one and broke down the barrier of the dividing wall,"

Ephesians 2:14, NLT: "For Christ himself has brought peace to us. He united Jews and Gentiles into one people when, in his own body on the cross, he broke down the wall of hostility that separated us."

Ephesians 2:14, CSB: "For he is our peace, who made both groups one and tore down the dividing wall of hostility. In his flesh,"

What does Ephesians 2:14 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul continues to describe how a saving faith in Christ changes our spiritual status. Jesus does not simply give peace; He is peace. It is because of who He is and what He has done on the cross, through the outpouring of His blood (Ephesians 2:13) that we can be at peace with God (Romans 5:1). Through Jesus, both Paul and his readers, Jews and Gentiles, were unified. All people can now become family: equals through the salvation provided in Jesus Christ.

In addition, Paul makes an interesting reference to removing a "dividing wall of hostility." Much debate surrounds the meaning of this phrase. Some have suggested a connection with the wall of the Jewish temple. Others see a reference to the tearing of the temple veil at the crucifixion (Matthew 27:51). However, Paul does not appear to have a physical wall in mind, but rather a personal barrier which previously existed between Jews and Gentiles. This seems to fit best with the context of the passage, which is focused on Gentiles becoming part of the family of God. The use of the wall metaphor is likely a simple reference to the idea of a city wall, which divided those who lived in the city (the citizens) from those outside (the foreigners).