Acts 7:10 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 7:10, NIV: and rescued him from all his troubles. He gave Joseph wisdom and enabled him to gain the goodwill of Pharaoh king of Egypt. So Pharaoh made him ruler over Egypt and all his palace.

Acts 7:10, ESV: and rescued him out of all his afflictions and gave him favor and wisdom before Pharaoh, king of Egypt, who made him ruler over Egypt and over all his household.

Acts 7:10, KJV: And delivered him out of all his afflictions, and gave him favour and wisdom in the sight of Pharaoh king of Egypt; and he made him governor over Egypt and all his house.

Acts 7:10, NASB: and rescued him from all his afflictions, and granted him favor and wisdom in the sight of Pharaoh, king of Egypt, and he made him governor over Egypt and his entire household.

Acts 7:10, NLT: and rescued him from all his troubles. And God gave him favor before Pharaoh, king of Egypt. God also gave Joseph unusual wisdom, so that Pharaoh appointed him governor over all of Egypt and put him in charge of the palace.

Acts 7:10, CSB: and rescued him out of all his troubles. He gave him favor and wisdom in the sight of Pharaoh, king of Egypt, who appointed him ruler over Egypt and over his whole household.

What does Acts 7:10 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Stephen continues his defense against charges that he blasphemed the temple. Here, he puts the building into proper perspective. Joseph, son of Jacob, spent years in slavery and prison in Egypt, yet God was "with him" (Acts 7:9). Stephen quickly skips over Joseph's hardships during his initial years in Egypt. He doesn't need to go over Potiphar's wife's false accusation or Joseph's ensuing years in prison (Genesis 39:1–41:36). Stephen's audience knows the stories well. Stephen is just pointing out how God was with Joseph, even though he left the land God had promised Abraham's descendants and lived his life in Egypt.

God elevated His servant and prophet despite Joseph's rejection and betrayal by his brothers. Joseph was verified as a prophet through his own dreams (Genesis 37:1–11) and by his God-given ability to interpret others' dreams (Genesis 40:1—41:36). Joseph eventually rose to be the second most powerful man in Egypt.

Stephen has been showing how Jews were God's people without a nation or a temple. Now he starts to show how their rejection of God's prophets was a rejection of Him. Despite God's obvious hand on their brother in his younger years, nine of Jacob's oldest sons had sold Joseph into slavery (Genesis 37:12–36). Although Stephen's accusers claim to honor Moses and the other prophets of Israel, the Israelites have a long history of ignoring, rejecting, and even killing prophets. They rejected Moses before he led them out of Egypt and after (Acts 7:35, 39–40), they killed many of the prophets God sent throughout their history (Acts 7:52), and they killed the Prophet Moses promised would follow him: Jesus (Acts 7:37, 52).