Acts 19:27 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 19:27, NIV: "There is danger not only that our trade will lose its good name, but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis will be discredited; and the goddess herself, who is worshiped throughout the province of Asia and the world, will be robbed of her divine majesty.""

Acts 19:27, ESV: "And there is danger not only that this trade of ours may come into disrepute but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis may be counted as nothing, and that she may even be deposed from her magnificence, she whom all Asia and the world worship.”"

Acts 19:27, KJV: "So that not only this our craft is in danger to be set at nought; but also that the temple of the great goddess Diana should be despised, and her magnificence should be destroyed, whom all Asia and the world worshippeth."

Acts 19:27, NASB: "Not only is there danger that this trade of ours will fall into disrepute, but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis will be regarded as worthless, and that she whom all of Asia and the world worship will even be dethroned from her magnificence.'"

Acts 19:27, NLT: "Of course, I'm not just talking about the loss of public respect for our business. I'm also concerned that the temple of the great goddess Artemis will lose its influence and that Artemis--this magnificent goddess worshiped throughout the province of Asia and all around the world--will be robbed of her great prestige!'"

Acts 19:27, CSB: "Not only do we run a risk that our business may be discredited, but also that the temple of the great goddess Artemis may be despised and her magnificence come to the verge of ruin--the very one all of Asia and the world worship.""

What does Acts 19:27 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

The story of the silversmiths in Ephesus is intensely relevant for the modern world. Paul brings the message of Jesus: His loving sacrifice on the cross and His resurrection that offers forgiveness and reconciliation with God. The Holy Spirit works through Paul to heal infirmities and release people from bondage to demons and witchcraft. People from all over the district come to find the grace they so desperately need (Acts 19:8–12, 18–20, 26).

But the worship of Jesus threatens the livelihoods of craftsmen who make idols (Acts 19:23–25). They gather to brainstorm a marketing campaign. What they come up with is the fact that the province of Asia is identified by the worship of Artemis. If people return to worshiping Artemis, the craftsmen will get their business back.

It's telling that the worship of their goddess is a means to an end: the financial exploitation of people. The craftsmen would rather see the people stay enslaved to demons and witchcraft than find freedom. It's easier to make money off people who are oppressed than those who are free.

Asia is a province that takes up a large part of the southwest portion of modern-day Turkey; Ephesus is its capital. The temple to Artemis was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. Despite that the craftsmen nearly start a riot and Paul leaves soon after (Acts 20:1), pockets of Greek people in Asia continue to follow Jesus until 1923, when they are relocated to Greece after the Turkish war.