Acts 10:7 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 10:7, NIV: When the angel who spoke to him had gone, Cornelius called two of his servants and a devout soldier who was one of his attendants.

Acts 10:7, ESV: When the angel who spoke to him had departed, he called two of his servants and a devout soldier from among those who attended him,

Acts 10:7, KJV: And when the angel which spake unto Cornelius was departed, he called two of his household servants, and a devout soldier of them that waited on him continually;

Acts 10:7, NASB: When the angel who *spoke to him left, he summoned two of his servants and a devout soldier from his personal attendants,

Acts 10:7, NLT: As soon as the angel was gone, Cornelius called two of his household servants and a devout soldier, one of his personal attendants.

Acts 10:7, CSB: When the angel who spoke to him had gone, he called two of his household servants and a devout soldier, who was one of those who attended him.

What does Acts 10:7 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Cornelius is a centurion of the Italian Cohort. As such, he may have been a Roman citizen. He is stationed in Caesarea Maritima on the Mediterranean coast of northern Samaria, the home of Herod Agrippa I who reigned over Judea and Samaria (Acts 12:1). Despite such a prestigious position, Cornelius rejects emperor worship and the pantheon of Roman gods. Instead, he prays to the Jewish God and acts out his faith through charitable giving (Acts 10:1–6).

Because of his piety, God has sent an angel to tell Cornelius to bring Peter up from Joppa. As a military commander, Cornelius may not be free to travel the thirty-five miles south, so he sends two servants and a soldier who also follows God. This is similar to the centurion who sent Jewish elders to beg Jesus to save his servant. That centurion showed such trust he assumed Jesus could heal without entering his home. Jesus commended him for his faith (Luke 7:1–10).

There are times in life when God calls us to act and times when God seems somewhat removed. Cornelius shows faithfulness in both. When God gives him directions, he follows them immediately—even if they're as ridiculous as assuming a Jew would come to the home of a Gentile. But he also showed faithfulness in the longer period of waiting. He trusted God and did what he knew to do: pray and act.

Any time we don't sense clear direction from God, we need to consider that He has already told us what to do, at least through the Bible. Acting on those prior instructions are what will prepare us for the future.