Acts 10:29 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 10:29, NIV: So when I was sent for, I came without raising any objection. May I ask why you sent for me?'

Acts 10:29, ESV: So when I was sent for, I came without objection. I ask then why you sent for me.”

Acts 10:29, KJV: Therefore came I unto you without gainsaying, as soon as I was sent for: I ask therefore for what intent ye have sent for me?

Acts 10:29, NASB: That is why I came without even raising any objection when I was sent for. So I ask, for what reason did you send for me?'

Acts 10:29, NLT: So I came without objection as soon as I was sent for. Now tell me why you sent for me.'

Acts 10:29, CSB: That's why I came without any objection when I was sent for. So may I ask why you sent for me? "

What does Acts 10:29 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Two days prior, Peter had been praying on a rooftop in Joppa. God sent a vision explaining that the food restrictions in the Mosaic law have been lifted. Peter knew this, in some ways (Mark 7:19), but hadn't yet had an opportunity to test his convictions. Despite God's insistence, he was still reluctant. Even so, when three men, at least one of them a Gentile, arrived at the house, he invited them in and left for Caesarea Maritima the next day, as the Holy Spirit commanded him (Acts 10:9–23).

Again vaguely, Peter understands that the vision was only ostensibly about food. "Without objection" mirrors the Spirit's command to leave "without hesitation" in Acts 10:20. Peter didn't hesitate time-wise and he didn't object or otherwise show any reluctance. The Holy Spirit hasn't told him what is going on; for all he knows, this centurion is going to crucify him, as Jesus prophesied (John 21:18). So he asks why Cornelius has called him.

Cornelius explains that he, too, heard from the Lord. An angel told him to call on Peter to hear what Peter had to say (Acts 10:1–8). What Peter has to say is that the Lord Jesus was crucified, buried, and rose again, and anyone who declares allegiance to Him will be forgiven of their sins. To Peter's shock, while he is still speaking, the household of Gentiles believe and receive the Holy Spirit. Peter doesn't even have to lay hands on them (Acts 10:34–48). Two men receive cryptic orders from God without explanation. Both follow the instructions immediately. Suddenly the gospel is open to the Gentiles en masse and the scene is primed for the arrival of the apostle Paul and his ministry to the Roman world.