1 Corinthians 14:33 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

1 Corinthians 14:33, NIV: "For God is not a God of disorder but of peace--as in all the congregations of the Lord's people."

1 Corinthians 14:33, ESV: "For God is not a God of confusion but of peace. As in all the churches of the saints,"

1 Corinthians 14:33, KJV: "For God is not the author of confusion, but of peace, as in all churches of the saints."

1 Corinthians 14:33, NASB: "for God is not a God of confusion, but of peace. As in all the churches of the saints,"

1 Corinthians 14:33, NLT: "For God is not a God of disorder but of peace, as in all the meetings of God's holy people."

1 Corinthians 14:33, CSB: "since God is not a God of disorder but of peace. As in all the churches of the saints,"

What does 1 Corinthians 14:33 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This verse appears to wrap up Paul's thought about how the gifts of tongues and prophecy should be expressed in church services. Then, he will begin an entirely new thought about the role of women in those services.

First, Paul refers to his statement that the spirit of a prophet is subject to that person. This means a person is in full control of when he starts and stops expressing a spiritual gift. God's Holy Spirit does not take a person over in the sense that they lose control of themselves and awareness of their surroundings.

This reality is true because of God's character. God is not a God of confusion. It contradicts His nature to suggest His Holy Spirit takes a congregation over such that all were forced to speak at the same time, as listeners sit without any idea of what is being said. Design, intent, and orderliness are aspects of God's character. These are reflected in how He operates in the world and among His people. It should be reflected even in our church services.

Paul describes this character trait of orderliness as peace, meaning that God values peace and acts in ways that contribute to peace instead of chaos.

Paul introduces his next topic with the phrase, "as in all the churches of the saints." It should be noted that verse numbers were added later; Paul did not create them. Perhaps early translators understood this phrase to refer to the previous one. Modern translators understand it to introduce Paul's teaching on the role of women in the Corinthian church. Strictly speaking, either has merit, since the foundational concepts presented here apply to all believers.