1 Corinthians 10:27 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

1 Corinthians 10:27, NIV: If an unbeliever invites you to a meal and you want to go, eat whatever is put before you without raising questions of conscience.

1 Corinthians 10:27, ESV: If one of the unbelievers invites you to dinner and you are disposed to go, eat whatever is set before you without raising any question on the ground of conscience.

1 Corinthians 10:27, KJV: If any of them that believe not bid you to a feast, and ye be disposed to go; whatsoever is set before you, eat, asking no question for conscience sake.

1 Corinthians 10:27, NASB: If one of the unbelievers invites you and you want to go, eat anything that is set before you without asking questions, for the sake of conscience.

1 Corinthians 10:27, NLT: If someone who isn't a believer asks you home for dinner, accept the invitation if you want to. Eat whatever is offered to you without raising questions of conscience.

1 Corinthians 10:27, CSB: If any of the unbelievers invites you over and you want to go, eat everything that is set before you, without raising questions for the sake of conscience.

What does 1 Corinthians 10:27 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul is giving his final verdict on the issue of Christians eating food that has been offered to pagan idols. His first guideline is to eat the meat they buy in the market with a clear conscience. It's true that some of that meat likely will have been offered to one of Corinth's many idols. Paul tells the Christians not to worry about that. Meat is God's creation and a gift from Him, no matter whether it has been offered to an idol or not (1 Corinthians 8:4–7; 10:25–26).

Paul's second guideline is based on whether the meat may have been offered to an idol. Paul says that if an unbeliever invites a Christian to dinner in their home, the Christian should once again eat whatever food he or she is given with a clear conscience. They shouldn't ask about the meat's history with idols; they should just eat and enjoy. This, again, is in keeping with the idea that there is nothing inherently sinful about meat.

The following verse will show when a believer should turn down a meal offered by an unbeliever. The dividing line between these verses is crucial in Christian ethics. Sin is defined not in terms of simple lists, but an understanding of the will of God and the needs of others. Just as it's a sin for a person to violate their conscience (Romans 14:23), even if it's "weak" (1 Corinthians 8:7), it's a sin to carelessly tempt others to go beyond their convictions (1 Corinthians 8:10–12).