1 Corinthians 10:13 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

1 Corinthians 10:13, NIV: No temptation has overtaken you except what is common to mankind. And God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out so that you can endure it.

1 Corinthians 10:13, ESV: No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.

1 Corinthians 10:13, KJV: There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.

1 Corinthians 10:13, NASB: No temptation has overtaken you except something common to mankind; and God is faithful, so He will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able, but with the temptation will provide the way of escape also, so that you will be able to endure it.

1 Corinthians 10:13, NLT: The temptations in your life are no different from what others experience. And God is faithful. He will not allow the temptation to be more than you can stand. When you are tempted, he will show you a way out so that you can endure.

1 Corinthians 10:13, CSB: No temptation has come upon you except what is common to humanity. But God is faithful; he will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able, but with the temptation he will also provide the way out so that you may be able to bear it.

What does 1 Corinthians 10:13 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul's words in the previous verse might bring understandable concern, even to Christians: "let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall" (1 Corinthians 10:12). The context of that comment was avoiding sin, and not assuming that salvation brings us immunity from the earthly consequences of our own behaviors. Taken with other comments made by Paul (2 Corinthians 13:5; Galatians 6:3), it also serves as a warning to those who are arrogant or careless about their standing in Christ.

Temptation is a routine part of life. Our desire to sin can sometimes feel so much more powerful than our desire to do what is right before God. What if we cannot resist? What if, as some suggest, God puts us in a position where resistance is impossible: a scenario where we have no real choice, other than to sin? Or, at least, no hope of resisting the temptation?

In response to that kind of fear, the Bible offers reassurance: overcoming any given temptation is entirely possible. That is true for every Christian. First, Paul points out that none of us are uniquely tempted by sin—in the sense that our desire to sin, whatever unique form it takes for us, is common and ordinary. It has been experienced by countless others down through the generations. We are no more or less subject to temptation than those who came before us or walk alongside us. The experience of human temptation is part of what makes Christ's relationship to us one of trust and hope (Hebrews 4:14–16).

Second, our God is still for us. He loves us. He is not waiting for us to fail; He is ready to help us. One way that He helps believers is to actively work in our lives to keep us from ever being tempted beyond what we can resist. We might not always believe we can overcome temptation. Satan might encourage us to see some temptations as irresistible. God promises that we can, in the power of the Holy Spirit, respond to any given temptation by resisting it.

Finally, Paul adds to this promise that God will always make a way of escape out of whatever temptation stands before us. If we look for a way to say no to whatever sin compels us, God promises we will find it. In some cases, that might mean literally "escaping" from a situation, as Joseph ran away from his master's wife (Genesis 39:7–12). God is actively working to help those who are in Christ, who want to do what is right, to be successful.

Of course, we can turn down God's help in overcoming temptation, if we choose to willfully indulge. And that, ultimately, is what all sin is: a willful choice to do something other than what God wills (Romans 3:10).