Proverbs 5:10 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Proverbs 5:10, NIV: lest strangers feast on your wealth and your toil enrich the house of another.

Proverbs 5:10, ESV: lest strangers take their fill of your strength, and your labors go to the house of a foreigner,

Proverbs 5:10, KJV: Lest strangers be filled with thy wealth; and thy labours be in the house of a stranger;

Proverbs 5:10, NASB: And strangers will be filled with your strength, And your hard-earned possessions will go to the house of a foreigner;

Proverbs 5:10, NLT: Strangers will consume your wealth, and someone else will enjoy the fruit of your labor.

Proverbs 5:10, CSB: strangers will drain your resources, and your hard-earned pay will end up in a foreigner's house.

What does Proverbs 5:10 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

A popular slogan in post-Christian culture is, "If it feels good, do it." However, the lack of morals leads to pain and suffering. This was hinted at earlier in this chapter, where a seductive person seems to offer something sweet and smooth, but instead brings poison and pain (Proverbs 5:3–4). The specific sin mentioned in this passage is that of adultery. However, the basic concept applies to any form of sin and its consequences.

Attitudes claiming everything is relative and every person must define right or wrong according to their own preferences are a path away from God (Isaiah 53:6). Solomon tells his sons that falling for temptation effectively puts one's life, and possessions, and reputation, in the hands of other people. The ungodly world often claims that rebellion against God means "being in control" of one's own life. The opposite, in fact, is true. Sin enslaves (John 8:34), and those who succumb to sin are handing themselves over to be abused (1 Corinthians 6:12).

The prodigal son left home with an inheritance (Luke 15:12–13), but he returned home with nothing except regret (Luke 15:18–19). He had lost all his wealth in a foreign country. Also, a pig farmer in that foreign country had drained the prodigal's strength by putting him the fields to slop hogs and go hungry (Luke 15:14–16). Fortunately, this prodigal found that his father was forgiving (Luke 15:20).

Instead of squandering our strength, we ought to dedicate it to God and serve him with a loving heart. Jesus said the greatest commandment is to "love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength" (Mark 12:30).