Proverbs 13:22 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Proverbs 13:22, NIV: A good person leaves an inheritance for their children's children, but a sinner's wealth is stored up for the righteous.

Proverbs 13:22, ESV: A good man leaves an inheritance to his children’s children, but the sinner’s wealth is laid up for the righteous.

Proverbs 13:22, KJV: A good man leaveth an inheritance to his children's children: and the wealth of the sinner is laid up for the just.

Proverbs 13:22, NASB: A good person leaves an inheritance to his grandchildren, And the wealth of a sinner is stored up for the righteous.

Proverbs 13:22, NLT: Good people leave an inheritance to their grandchildren, but the sinner's wealth passes to the godly.

Proverbs 13:22, CSB: A good man leaves an inheritance to his grandchildren, but the sinner's wealth is stored up for the righteous.

What does Proverbs 13:22 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Material wealth is not guaranteed in this life, even for those who are moral and godly (John 16:33). A proverb, such as this, is not meant as a universal declaration, but a general statement of common sense. The important lesson in this type of statement is in the contrast being presented. Here, the point is about how righteousness and evil typically result in different outcomes, especially when it comes to lasting success. Those who obtain wealth honestly have a better chance of retaining it, and passing it down, than the person who lives by sin and evil.

A good man handles money and goods wisely, according to godly principles like prudence and generosity (Proverbs 1:7; 11:25; 19:17). He doesn't spend according to the desires of the flesh, the desires of the eyes, or the pride of life; he spends as a faithful steward of what God has entrusted to him. A person who is content with what he has does not feel pressured to spend more than he sensibly should (Proverbs 13:25; 1 Timothy 6:6). He considers all that the Lord has blessed him with as the Lord's and not exclusively his money and goods. He wisely lives within his means, saves as consistently as possible, and has material goods and money to leave to his children and grandchildren.

In contrast, the foolish person rejects God (Psalm 10:4). This makes them more likely to waste or lose their wealth, or have it taken as punishment for their crimes.