Philippians 4:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Philippians 4:9, NIV: Whatever you have learned or received or heard from me, or seen in me--put it into practice. And the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:9, ESV: What you have learned and received and heard and seen in me—practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:9, KJV: Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you.

Philippians 4:9, NASB: As for the things you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, practice these things, and the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:9, NLT: Keep putting into practice all you learned and received from me--everything you heard from me and saw me doing. Then the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:9, CSB: Do what you have learned and received and heard from me, and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.

What does Philippians 4:9 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul offers four ways in which he had offered teachings for his readers to follow. First, he referred to following the teachings he had given them in the past, prior to the writing of this letter. These are most likely the thoughts and ideas Paul himself had developed during his ministry.

Second, they are to follow what they had "received" from him. This probably also refers to Paul's teachings, with an emphasis on oral lessons and personal interaction. It is also likely a reference to ideas Paul had received from the Lord and perhaps the apostles (1 Corinthians 15:1–5), and in turn given to others.

Third, they are to follow what they had heard from Paul. Again, this likely included both his written and oral teachings. These would all have been considered equally authoritative.

Fourth, they are to follow what they had seen in Paul. Paul's example served as a living teaching tool to the Philippian believers. Previously, Paul had specifically asked his readers to mimic his approach (Philippians 3:17).

As usual, Paul's instructions are not merely meant to be known, or agreed to. They are meant to be put into action. The use of the Greek word prassete implies an ongoing, daily effort. This is not a one-time attempt or short-term effort to follow God. Those who followed Paul's advice can experience the incredible peace that comes from fellowship with God. Paul also uses the title "God of peace" in Romans 15:33; 16:20, and 1 Thessalonians 5:23. The only other place this phrase is found in the New Testament is Hebrews 13:20.