Philippians 4:3 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Philippians 4:3, NIV: Yes, and I ask you, my true companion, help these women since they have contended at my side in the cause of the gospel, along with Clement and the rest of my co-workers, whose names are in the book of life.

Philippians 4:3, ESV: Yes, I ask you also, true companion, help these women, who have labored side by side with me in the gospel together with Clement and the rest of my fellow workers, whose names are in the book of life.

Philippians 4:3, KJV: And I intreat thee also, true yokefellow, help those women which laboured with me in the gospel, with Clement also, and with other my fellowlabourers, whose names are in the book of life.

Philippians 4:3, NASB: Indeed, true companion, I ask you also, help these women who have shared my struggle in the cause of the gospel, together with Clement as well as the rest of my fellow workers, whose names are in the book of life.

Philippians 4:3, NLT: And I ask you, my true partner, to help these two women, for they worked hard with me in telling others the Good News. They worked along with Clement and the rest of my co-workers, whose names are written in the Book of Life.

Philippians 4:3, CSB: Yes, I also ask you, true partner, to help these women who have contended for the gospel at my side, along with Clement and the rest of my coworkers whose names are in the book of life.

What does Philippians 4:3 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

In verse 2, Paul asked two women named Euodia and Syntyche to end their disagreement. In this verse, Paul also asks an unnamed church leader to assist them. Some suggest the Greek word sygyge, translated as "companion," is actually a proper name. However, the context of the passage and the Greek grammar involved both argue against this view. Instead, this unnamed church leader was likely known to all involved but is unmentioned in the letter.

These two women disagreed on some issue, but they had worked together with Paul, Clement, and others. The Clement mentioned here may very well be the same man who authored the writing Clement of Rome—or 1 Clement, written approximately AD 95, though this is not certain. He was at least known to Paul's readers and was in Philippi at the time the letter was written. Regardless, these individuals were all considered believers "whose names are in the book of life." The book of life is mentioned elsewhere only in Revelation (Revelation 3:5; 13:8; 17:8; 20:12, 15; 21:27), where it is used six times in reference to a list of those who will live with the Lord in eternity (Luke 10:20).