Matthew 5:24 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Matthew 5:24, NIV: leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled to them; then come and offer your gift.

Matthew 5:24, ESV: leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.

Matthew 5:24, KJV: Leave there thy gift before the altar, and go thy way; first be reconciled to thy brother, and then come and offer thy gift.

Matthew 5:24, NASB: leave youroffering there before the altar and go; first be reconciled to your brother, and then come and present youroffering.

Matthew 5:24, NLT: leave your sacrifice there at the altar. Go and be reconciled to that person. Then come and offer your sacrifice to God.

Matthew 5:24, CSB: leave your gift there in front of the altar. First go and be reconciled with your brother or sister, and then come and offer your gift.

What does Matthew 5:24 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Jesus has shown how deeply God cares about the hearts of His people. In recent examples, He has placed inner attitudes, like anger, into the same category of "sin" as murder (Matthew 5:21–22). In fact, Jesus said that one who angrily insults or condemns another in anger is liable to the hell of fire. Avoiding unresolved conflict is so important, in fact, that even the most sacred action should be postponed until a reconciliation can be made with another person (Matthew 5:23).

In the previous verse, Jesus placed responsibility on the person who realizes they've given another person cause to be angry. Christ's instruction is to "leave your gift" at the altar instead of finishing what you're doing. Go to your "brother," whether literally or simply a friend or associate, and make things right as soon as possible. Don't wait. Then come back and finish your worship after you've sought reconciliation.

The broad principle of these verses is that our hearts are not right with God if they are not right with each other. We can't worship God with a sincere spirit if we are unrepentant about causing another person legitimate offense.