Judges 9:19 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Judges 9:19, NIV: So have you acted honorably and in good faith toward Jerub-Baal and his family today? If you have, may Abimelek be your joy, and may you be his, too!

Judges 9:19, ESV: if you then have acted in good faith and integrity with Jerubbaal and with his house this day, then rejoice in Abimelech, and let him also rejoice in you.

Judges 9:19, KJV: If ye then have dealt truly and sincerely with Jerubbaal and with his house this day, then rejoice ye in Abimelech, and let him also rejoice in you:

Judges 9:19, NASB: so if you have acted with honesty and integrity toward Jerubbaal and his house this day, be joyful about Abimelech, and may he also be joyful about you.

Judges 9:19, NLT: 'If you have acted honorably and in good faith toward Gideon and his descendants today, then may you find joy in Abimelech, and may he find joy in you.

Judges 9:19, CSB: so if you have acted faithfully and honestly with Jerubbaal and his house this day, rejoice in Abimelech and may he also rejoice in you.

What does Judges 9:19 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This is part of an unscheduled speech shouted over the people of Shechem (Judges 9:7). At the coronation of his murderous brother, Abimelech (Judges 9:1–6), Jotham lays out a fable (Judges 9:8–15). The application is given afterwards: that Abimelech is a worthless, dangerous choice who has no legitimate place as a ruler. The people have disrespected Gideon's memory (Judges 9:16–18) by funding the murder of his sons and selecting a servant's son as their king.

Jotham lays on sarcasm in this verse. He says the people and Abimelech should be happy with each other, if Shechem has acted with honesty and sincerity. It's abundantly clear in all Jotham has pointed out that Shechem has not, at all, acted with integrity or good faith in making Abimelech king. They betrayed Jotham's father, Gideon, instead of honoring the hero used by God to deliver them (Judges 7:19–23) from the Midianites. They used Abimelech to attack their rivals, but don't sincerely believe he is a worthy king. As paralleled in the fable about the bramble, this means the people should expect mutual destruction (Judges 9:20).