Judges 10:14 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Judges 10:14, NIV: Go and cry out to the gods you have chosen. Let them save you when you are in trouble!'

Judges 10:14, ESV: Go and cry out to the gods whom you have chosen; let them save you in the time of your distress.”

Judges 10:14, KJV: Go and cry unto the gods which ye have chosen; let them deliver you in the time of your tribulation.

Judges 10:14, NASB: Go and cry out to the gods which you have chosen; let them save you in the time of your distress.'

Judges 10:14, NLT: Go and cry out to the gods you have chosen! Let them rescue you in your hour of distress!'

Judges 10:14, CSB: Go and cry out to the gods you have chosen. Let them deliver you whenever you are oppressed."

What does Judges 10:14 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Anyone who wonders if God uses sarcasm should note how this verse drips with it. Israel has cried out to the Lord with a confession of their sin (Judges 10:10). He has reminded them of how often He has responded to their cries for help by giving them victory over oppressors. And still, they chose to betray Him and dive ever deeper into sin (Judges 10:11–12). This pattern of repeated rescue and faithlessness is the rhythm of the book of Judges (Judges 2:11–19).

In a shocking statement, God has flatly refused to save Israel again (Judges 10:13). He now sarcastically tells the people to ask their false gods for help. This is both a challenge and a brutal indictment of Israel's sin. There's no possibility, in God's statement, that these idols are real. The fact that the people are being brutalized after choosing to ignore God shows that relying on idols is ineffective. The lie of their worship has been revealed, and they have forsaken their only hope.

Were this the end of the story, it would be horrifying, but entirely justified (Proverbs 29:1; Romans 9:18). God's patience is incredible (Psalm 86:15), not infinite (1 Peter 3:20). And yet, His plans for His chosen people (Genesis 12:3; 17:5–6) mean God is not ready to abandon Israel (Psalm 94:14). His cutting response is meant to drive Israel to something more than shallow regret (Hosea 10:4; 2 Corinthians 7:10). They need to express real, living repentance—and they do just that (Judges 10:15–16).