Genesis 7:4 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 7:4, NIV: "Seven days from now I will send rain on the earth for forty days and forty nights, and I will wipe from the face of the earth every living creature I have made.'"

Genesis 7:4, ESV: "For in seven days I will send rain on the earth forty days and forty nights, and every living thing that I have made I will blot out from the face of the ground.”"

Genesis 7:4, KJV: "For yet seven days, and I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days and forty nights; and every living substance that I have made will I destroy from off the face of the earth."

Genesis 7:4, NASB: "For after seven more days, I will send rain on the earth for forty days and forty nights; and I will wipe out from the face of the land every living thing that I have made.'"

Genesis 7:4, NLT: "Seven days from now I will make the rains pour down on the earth. And it will rain for forty days and forty nights, until I have wiped from the earth all the living things I have created.'"

Genesis 7:4, CSB: "Seven days from now I will make it rain on the earth forty days and forty nights, and every living thing I have made I will wipe off the face of the earth.""

What does Genesis 7:4 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

In the prior verses, God instructed Noah to board the ark along with his family, and all the animals God intends to save. As one would expect, this took quite some time to complete. God reveals His final deadline for the flood to Noah: seven days. In seven days from this moment, the rain would start. It would continue for 40 days and 40 nights, a deluge that would end all life "from the face of the ground."

Noah had one week to get everything inside the ark which would be needed during the coming wrath of God. Everything left outside, including the rest of the human race, would be utterly destroyed. According to verse 13, they are able to complete this task in exactly the amount of time they have left.

The word used for "earth" here is from the Hebrew root 'erets. Some Bible scholars interpret this account as a local flood—one covering the territory of men, but not necessarily the entire globe. Terms such as this are part of that discussion. There are other Hebrew terms used to explicitly describe the entire planet, such as tebel, but these are not used in the flood accounts.

Regardless of a local or global interpretation, what's clear is both the intent and the effect of this catastrophe: the complete elimination of the human race, except for Noah and his family.