Genesis 6:13 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 6:13, NIV: "So God said to Noah, 'I am going to put an end to all people, for the earth is filled with violence because of them. I am surely going to destroy both them and the earth."

Genesis 6:13, ESV: "And God said to Noah, “I have determined to make an end of all flesh, for the earth is filled with violence through them. Behold, I will destroy them with the earth."

Genesis 6:13, KJV: "And God said unto Noah, The end of all flesh is come before me; for the earth is filled with violence through them; and, behold, I will destroy them with the earth."

Genesis 6:13, NASB: "Then God said to Noah, 'The end of humanity has come before Me; for the earth is filled with violence because of people; and behold, I am about to destroy them with the earth."

Genesis 6:13, NLT: "So God said to Noah, 'I have decided to destroy all living creatures, for they have filled the earth with violence. Yes, I will wipe them all out along with the earth!"

Genesis 6:13, CSB: "Then God said to Noah, "I have decided to put an end to every creature, for the earth is filled with wickedness because of them; therefore I am going to destroy them along with the earth."

What does Genesis 6:13 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

God begins revealing His plan to Noah. We can only assume it must have been devastating for Noah to hear. As a righteous, blameless man who walked with God (v. 9), Noah would likely have agreed that the earth was filled with violence because of the sinfulness of humanity. But could anything have prepared Him for God's announcement? We can't be entirely sure about how many relatives, including possibly other children, Noah had at this time. Regardless, the idea of the entire human world being killed would have been terrifying.

In plain language, God told Noah that He was getting ready to put an end to all of humanity because of their violence. He would destroy "all flesh," meaning both humanity and animals, along with the earth—or land—itself. In one blunt statement, God announces to Noah both His verdict and the sentence on humanity. God would exercise His right as creator and judge; He would hold His creatures responsible for their sinful choices. He alone had (and still has) both the right and the power to carry out such a plan.