Genesis 47:26 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 47:26, NIV: So Joseph established it as a law concerning land in Egypt--still in force today--that a fifth of the produce belongs to Pharaoh. It was only the land of the priests that did not become Pharaoh's.

Genesis 47:26, ESV: So Joseph made it a statute concerning the land of Egypt, and it stands to this day, that Pharaoh should have the fifth; the land of the priests alone did not become Pharaoh’s.

Genesis 47:26, KJV: And Joseph made it a law over the land of Egypt unto this day, that Pharaoh should have the fifth part; except the land of the priests only, which became not Pharaoh's.

Genesis 47:26, NASB: Joseph made it a statute concerning the land of Egypt, valid to this day, that Pharaoh was to have the fifth; only the land of the priests did not become Pharaoh’s.

Genesis 47:26, NLT: Joseph then issued a decree still in effect in the land of Egypt, that Pharaoh should receive one-fifth of all the crops grown on his land. Only the land belonging to the priests was not given to Pharaoh.

Genesis 47:26, CSB: So Joseph made it a law, still in effect today in the land of Egypt, that a fifth of the produce belongs to Pharaoh. Only the priests' land does not belong to Pharaoh.

What does Genesis 47:26 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This verse sums up the lasting result of this season in Egypt's history. The Lord has worked through Joseph to save the lives of many people in Egypt and the surrounding regions. Still, that rescue has come at a cost. The people have been forced to sell their cash, their livestock, their land, and their freedom to Pharaoh's government in exchange for food (Genesis 47:13–22). The result is an understanding that Pharaoh owns almost everything in Egypt.

Under the agreement, however, the people continued to work their farms and tend their livestock. Like a combination of a mortgage or income tax, they would give 20 percent of each year's harvest to Pharaoh. As the famine continued, this would mostly mean Pharaoh's household providing seed. Over time, it would become extremely profitable for the Egyptian monarchy. This arrangement remained in effect at the time Genesis was written.