Genesis 37:10 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 37:10, NIV: When he told his father as well as his brothers, his father rebuked him and said, 'What is this dream you had? Will your mother and I and your brothers actually come and bow down to the ground before you?'

Genesis 37:10, ESV: But when he told it to his father and to his brothers, his father rebuked him and said to him, “What is this dream that you have dreamed? Shall I and your mother and your brothers indeed come to bow ourselves to the ground before you?”

Genesis 37:10, KJV: And he told it to his father, and to his brethren: and his father rebuked him, and said unto him, What is this dream that thou hast dreamed? Shall I and thy mother and thy brethren indeed come to bow down ourselves to thee to the earth?

Genesis 37:10, NASB: He also told it to his father as well as to his brothers; and his father rebuked him and said to him, 'What is this dream that you have had? Am I and your mother and your brothers actually going to come to bow down to the ground before you?'

Genesis 37:10, NLT: This time he told the dream to his father as well as to his brothers, but his father scolded him. 'What kind of dream is that?' he asked. 'Will your mother and I and your brothers actually come and bow to the ground before you?'

Genesis 37:10, CSB: He told his father and brothers, and his father rebuked him. "What kind of dream is this that you have had? " he said. "Am I and your mother and your brothers really going to come and bow down to the ground before you? "

What does Genesis 37:10 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Joseph has revealed a second prophetic dream (Genesis 37:5–7) where the sun, moon, and 11 stars bowed down to him (Genesis 37:9). As the story of Genesis will reveal, Joseph's dreams will be fulfilled (Genesis 42:6). His family will eventually bow down before him, in submission and need.

Leading up to this, Joseph's brothers already hated him so much they couldn't speak politely (Genesis 37:4). Genesis doesn't comment as to whether Joseph was wise to tell them about the dreams instead of keeping them to himself. All the same, things are beginning to reach a boiling point for this family. Even Jacob, who clearly loves and favors Joseph over his brothers (Genesis 37:3), scolds him for suggesting they will one day bow themselves to the ground as if they were his subjects. Jacob's own experience with dreams (Genesis 28:10–16) suggests he's not angry at Joseph for having the dream, but for the way he chose to share it.

Jacob's harsh reprimand likely provides Joseph's brothers with enough justification to finally act on their hatred and jealousy in the following verses (Genesis 37:18, 28).