Genesis 26:22 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 26:22, NIV: "He moved on from there and dug another well, and no one quarreled over it. He named it Rehoboth, saying, 'Now the LORD has given us room and we will flourish in the land.'"

Genesis 26:22, ESV: "And he moved from there and dug another well, and they did not quarrel over it. So he called its name Rehoboth, saying, “For now the LORD has made room for us, and we shall be fruitful in the land.”"

Genesis 26:22, KJV: "And he removed from thence, and digged another well; and for that they strove not: and he called the name of it Rehoboth; and he said, For now the LORD hath made room for us, and we shall be fruitful in the land."

Genesis 26:22, NASB: "Then he moved away from there and dug another well, and they did not quarrel over it; so he named it Rehoboth, for he said, 'At last the LORD has made room for us, and we will be fruitful in the land.'"

Genesis 26:22, NLT: "Abandoning that one, Isaac moved on and dug another well. This time there was no dispute over it, so Isaac named the place Rehoboth (which means 'open space'), for he said, 'At last the LORD has created enough space for us to prosper in this land.'"

Genesis 26:22, CSB: "He moved from there and dug another, and they did not quarrel over it. He named it Rehoboth and said, "For now the LORD has made space for us, and we will be fruitful in the land.""

What does Genesis 26:22 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Having moved some distance away from the main population of Gerar (Genesis 26:14–17), Isaac's men have dug two wells so far. In both cases, they were challenged by the local herdsmen over the rights to the water. Isaac named both wells to represent the disputes that came from them (Genesis 26:18–21). The first was called Esek, the second Sitnah, meaning "contention" and "quarrel," respectively. This choice seems to reflect a passive attitude on the part of Isaac, since he's clearly powerful enough to keep those wells by force, if he so chose.

The third well, however, brings no dispute from the locals. Perhaps they gave up challenging Isaac once they realized he would just keep digging wells. Or, perhaps Isaac's family has moved far enough away that it's just not worth a challenge from the locals anymore, we don't know, but Isaac appears to be satisfied. He names this well Rehoboth, which means "broad places" or "room," and he gives credit to the Lord for providing it.

Specifically, Isaac notices that the Lord has made room for his enormous estate to settle in the region. Nothing would now stand in the way of the fruitful growth of all of his possessions.