Genesis 18:5 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 18:5, NIV: "Let me get you something to eat, so you can be refreshed and then go on your way--now that you have come to your servant.' 'Very well,' they answered, 'do as you say.'"

Genesis 18:5, ESV: "while I bring a morsel of bread, that you may refresh yourselves, and after that you may pass on—since you have come to your servant.” So they said, “Do as you have said.”"

Genesis 18:5, KJV: "And I will fetch a morsel of bread, and comfort ye your hearts; after that ye shall pass on: for therefore are ye come to your servant. And they said, So do, as thou hast said."

Genesis 18:5, NASB: "and I will bring a piece of bread, so that you may refresh yourselves; after that you may go on, since you have visited your servant.' And they said, 'So do as you have said.'"

Genesis 18:5, NLT: "And since you've honored your servant with this visit, let me prepare some food to refresh you before you continue on your journey.' 'All right,' they said. 'Do as you have said.'"

Genesis 18:5, CSB: "I will bring a bit of bread so that you may strengthen yourselves. This is why you have passed your servant's way. Later, you can continue on." "Yes," they replied, "do as you have said.""

What does Genesis 18:5 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Abraham continues to plead with the three men who appeared near his tent not to leave too quickly. One of the men is the Lord in human form. The other two are angels also disguised as humans.

After asking them to receive rest and water and the washing of their feet in the previous verse, Abraham now includes the offer of a morsel of bread before they pass on. As the following verses will reveal, Abraham is vastly understating the meal he plans to provide.

Abraham, a wealthy and powerful man with many servants, refers to himself as the servant of these men. Indeed, he acts as if he were a servant eager to please his master. This might have been Abraham's way of expressing his culture's typical approach to hospitality. Or, his extravagant response might have been because he knew, immediately, with whom he was speaking.

Finally, the strangers agree to wait while Abraham provides for their refreshment.