Genesis 11:31 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Genesis 11:31, NIV: "Terah took his son Abram, his grandson Lot son of Haran, and his daughter-in-law Sarai, the wife of his son Abram, and together they set out from Ur of the Chaldeans to go to Canaan. But when they came to Harran, they settled there."

Genesis 11:31, ESV: "Terah took Abram his son and Lot the son of Haran, his grandson, and Sarai his daughter-in-law, his son Abram’s wife, and they went forth together from Ur of the Chaldeans to go into the land of Canaan, but when they came to Haran, they settled there."

Genesis 11:31, KJV: "And Terah took Abram his son, and Lot the son of Haran his son's son, and Sarai his daughter in law, his son Abram's wife; and they went forth with them from Ur of the Chaldees, to go into the land of Canaan; and they came unto Haran, and dwelt there."

Genesis 11:31, NASB: "Now Terah took his son Abram, and Lot the son of Haran, his grandson, and his daughter-in-law Sarai, his son Abram’s wife, and they departed together from Ur of the Chaldeans to go to the land of Canaan; and they went as far as Haran and settled there."

Genesis 11:31, NLT: "One day Terah took his son Abram, his daughter-in-law Sarai (his son Abram's wife), and his grandson Lot (his son Haran's child) and moved away from Ur of the Chaldeans. He was headed for the land of Canaan, but they stopped at Haran and settled there."

Genesis 11:31, CSB: "Terah took his son Abram, his grandson Lot (Haran's son), and his daughter-in-law Sarai, his son Abram's wife, and they set out together from Ur of the Chaldeans to go to the land of Canaan. But when they came to Haran, they settled there."

What does Genesis 11:31 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

No specific reason is given here for the family's migration from Ur. Terah, Abram, and the whole family left their home and headed for the land of Canaan. While that was their intended destination, they never reached it. Instead, after traveling some 600 miles, they settle in Haran. Scholars speculate that perhaps Terah had lived in Haran previously, and was returning. This might have been inspired by Haran's death (Genesis 11:28), something which the inclusion of Haran's son, Lot, seems to support.