Galatians 1:10 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Galatians 1:10, NIV: Am I now trying to win the approval of human beings, or of God? Or am I trying to please people? If I were still trying to please people, I would not be a servant of Christ.

Galatians 1:10, ESV: For am I now seeking the approval of man, or of God? Or am I trying to please man? If I were still trying to please man, I would not be a servant of Christ.

Galatians 1:10, KJV: For do I now persuade men, or God? or do I seek to please men? for if I yet pleased men, I should not be the servant of Christ.

Galatians 1:10, NASB: For am I now seeking the favor of people, or of God? Or am I striving to please people? If I were still trying to please people, I would not be a bond-servant of Christ.

Galatians 1:10, NLT: Obviously, I'm not trying to win the approval of people, but of God. If pleasing people were my goal, I would not be Christ's servant.

Galatians 1:10, CSB: For am I now trying to persuade people, or God? Or am I striving to please people? If I were still trying to please people, I would not be a servant of Christ.

What does Galatians 1:10 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul began his letter to the Galatian Christians by telling them again the simple gospel message: Jesus died to pay for our sins and to deliver us (Galatians 1:4). Period. As he expressed it in Ephesians 2:8–9, we are saved by faith through grace, not by any works we do. As he will say later in this letter, to suggest that we must do more to be truly saved is to make Jesus' death on the cross meaningless (Galatians 2:21).

A group known as the Judaizers had moved in after Paul left. They had begun to convince the Galatian Christians that more was required. To be truly saved, you must also follow the law of Moses. This raises a question: how did they convince these Gentile (non-Jewish) believers Paul was wrong?

For one, they apparently questioned whether Paul was a "real apostle," something Paul will answer in the following verses. In addition, they seem to have suggested that Paul did not require these Gentiles to follow the law of Moses because he was trying to make everyone happy. They suggested Paul was just a people-pleaser, willing to alter the truth in order to be liked.

Paul now answers that charge: If he were really trying to please men instead of God, would he have just pronounced as cursed anyone who taught a gospel message other than the one he taught them? Look at the evidence, he says. I am not trying to please any man; I am serving Christ and seeking God's approval. Otherwise, Paul implies, he would simply go along with the Judaizers. He clearly is not doing that.