Acts 24:24 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 24:24, NIV: "Several days later Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish. He sent for Paul and listened to him as he spoke about faith in Christ Jesus."

Acts 24:24, ESV: "After some days Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish, and he sent for Paul and heard him speak about faith in Christ Jesus."

Acts 24:24, KJV: "And after certain days, when Felix came with his wife Drusilla, which was a Jewess, he sent for Paul, and heard him concerning the faith in Christ."

Acts 24:24, NASB: "Now some days later Felix arrived with Drusilla his wife, who was Jewish, and he sent for Paul and heard him speak about faith in Christ Jesus."

Acts 24:24, NLT: "A few days later Felix came back with his wife, Drusilla, who was Jewish. Sending for Paul, they listened as he told them about faith in Christ Jesus."

Acts 24:24, CSB: "Several days later, when Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish, he sent for Paul and listened to him on the subject of faith in Christ Jesus."

What does Acts 24:24 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul is under house arrest in Caesarea Maritima. The Sanhedrin charged him with a list of crimes, but he easily refuted them all (Acts 24:1–21). Governor Felix can't convict him because he's innocent, and he can't make him disappear because Paul's a Roman citizen, but he won't release him because if he does the Jewish leadership may cause problems. What he can do is periodically call Paul in to talk in hopes Paul will offer him a bribe (Acts 24:26–27).

Their discussions resemble those of Herod Antipas and John the Baptist (Mark 6:20). These revolve around Jesus, righteousness, self-control, and God's judgment (Acts 24:25). Historians of that era described Felix as "tyrannical" as well as "cruel, licentious, and base." Felix's wife, Herod Agrippa I's daughter, had been married to another man when Felix stole her. The citizens of Caesarea complain about Felix so much that two years after Paul's arrest Nero orders Felix to report to Rome. Only the intervention of Felix's brother, Pallas, protects him from conviction.

Felix's desire for a bribe keeps him talking with Paul. Paul's convicting words keep the conversations short. Felix doesn't change his ways, but he and Drusilla can't be the only ones listening. Although Paul can't travel and there's no indication that he writes to any of the churches from Caesarea, he has a captive audience and friends who can visit him regularly. Philip's family and church are in Caesarea (Acts 21:8). Paul's well-being is in the charge of a centurion (Acts 24:23). Undoubtedly, his extended stay results in many people from Felix's court becoming Jesus-followers.