Acts 24:15 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 24:15, NIV: "and I have the same hope in God as these men themselves have, that there will be a resurrection of both the righteous and the wicked."

Acts 24:15, ESV: "having a hope in God, which these men themselves accept, that there will be a resurrection of both the just and the unjust."

Acts 24:15, KJV: "And have hope toward God, which they themselves also allow, that there shall be a resurrection of the dead, both of the just and unjust."

Acts 24:15, NASB: "having a hope in God, which these men cherish themselves, that there shall certainly be a resurrection of both the righteous and the wicked."

Acts 24:15, NLT: "I have the same hope in God that these men have, that he will raise both the righteous and the unrighteous."

Acts 24:15, CSB: "I have a hope in God, which these men themselves also accept, that there will be a resurrection, both of the righteous and the unrighteous."

What does Acts 24:15 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul, ever clever, is aligning himself under the umbrella of his accusers to defeat their claims against them. They have called him "a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes" (Acts 24:5), assuming Governor Felix will identify Paul's beliefs as a religion that is not Judaism and not sanctioned by Roman law. To spread the teaching of a faith system that does not have permission from the Empire was illegal.

Sidestepping this, at least in the eyes of Roman law, Paul confesses he follows Judaism in a slightly different Way. His beliefs are those taught by the Nazarene Jesus, yet he still worships the same God and believes the same Scriptures (Acts 24:14). The only applicable charge they can make against him—the only time he stirred up a "riot" (Acts 24:5) in Felix's jurisdiction—started when he stood before this same Sanhedrin and called out that he believes in the resurrection of the dead. The Sadducees, who don't share that belief, became indignant; the Pharisees, who do, came to Paul's defense. The two sides fell to blows (Acts 23:6–10).

Paul's accusers include the high priest and some of the elders (Acts 24:1). The high priest is a Sadducee, as are most of the Sanhedrin. But some members are Pharisees, and it is to these that Paul refers.

This is the only place in the Bible where Paul states the unrighteous will be resurrected. His belief that the righteous will rise is well documented (1 Corinthians 15:20–23; Philippians 3:20–21). That the unjust are also resurrected means the doctrine of annihilationism—that those who reject Jesus will be completely destroyed—is not accurate (Matthew 25:46; Revelation 20:13–15).