Acts 20:9 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 20:9, NIV: "Seated in a window was a young man named Eutychus, who was sinking into a deep sleep as Paul talked on and on. When he was sound asleep, he fell to the ground from the third story and was picked up dead."

Acts 20:9, ESV: "And a young man named Eutychus, sitting at the window, sank into a deep sleep as Paul talked still longer. And being overcome by sleep, he fell down from the third story and was taken up dead."

Acts 20:9, KJV: "And there sat in a window a certain young man named Eutychus, being fallen into a deep sleep: and as Paul was long preaching, he sunk down with sleep, and fell down from the third loft, and was taken up dead."

Acts 20:9, NASB: "And there was a young man named Eutychus sitting on the window sill, sinking into a deep sleep; and as Paul kept on talking, Eutychus was overcome by sleep and fell down from the third floor, and was picked up dead."

Acts 20:9, NLT: "As Paul spoke on and on, a young man named Eutychus, sitting on the windowsill, became very drowsy. Finally, he fell sound asleep and dropped three stories to his death below."

Acts 20:9, CSB: "and a young man named Eutychus was sitting on a window sill and sank into a deep sleep as Paul kept on talking. When he was overcome by sleep, he fell down from the third story and was picked up dead."

What does Acts 20:9 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

For a week, Paul has been in Troas. He has about five weeks to reach Jerusalem if he wants to get there by Pentecost (Acts 20:16). His schedule is so tight he won't even go to Ephesus for fear of getting distracted and missing his window. He knows that when he reaches Jerusalem the Romans will imprison him (Acts 20:22–23). Now, he spends the night with the church in Troas, making sure they understand everything they need to know to thrive in his absence.

The church and at least some of Paul's companions listen and discuss in an upper room. Normally, because there are fewer floors above that require pillars for support, upper rooms are open and airy with larger windows that catch the breezes. This night, with all the people and the oil lamps (Acts 20:8), there's probably little airflow. Eutychus falls asleep, then falls out the window.

Those who disbelieve miracles in the Bible insist that Eutychus doesn't really die. Luke, as a doctor, would know the difference. Peter has already brought Dorcas back to life (Acts 9:36–42). In this case, Eutychus's resurrection provides comfort and encouragement for the church (Acts 20:12).