Acts 20:7 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 20:7, NIV: "On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people and, because he intended to leave the next day, kept on talking until midnight."

Acts 20:7, ESV: "On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul talked with them, intending to depart on the next day, and he prolonged his speech until midnight."

Acts 20:7, KJV: "And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight."

Acts 20:7, NASB: "On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul began talking to them, intending to leave the next day, and he prolonged his message until midnight."

Acts 20:7, NLT: "On the first day of the week, we gathered with the local believers to share in the Lord's Supper. Paul was preaching to them, and since he was leaving the next day, he kept talking until midnight."

Acts 20:7, CSB: "On the first day of the week, we assembled to break bread. Paul spoke to them, and since he was about to depart the next day, he kept on talking until midnight."

What does Acts 20:7 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Troas is the major port where the Aegean Sea meets the northwest coast of modern-day Turkey. Paul is there, planning to sail to Jerusalem to celebrate Pentecost (Acts 20:16). He had originally planned to sail from Corinth, a much more direct trip, but the Jewish leaders there plotted against him, and he had to skirt the coast instead (Acts 20:3). So, he stays in Troas for a week and has an opportunity to meet with the church (Acts 20:6).

The Jewish Sabbath is from evening on Friday to evening on Saturday. God gave the Jews the Sabbath to rest and to trust Him for provision. It is based on the seventh day that God rested from creation (Genesis 2:2). The early Christians meet on Sunday. First, because it is the day of the week that Jesus rose from the dead (Matthew 28:1). Second, because it represents the first day of creation—the church is something new, and the Jesus-followers have work to do.

"Break bread" can have different meanings. It may refer to a community meal (a "love feast"), a meal provided for the poor, or the Lord's supper. Considering the date given is the first day of the week, this is probably communion. In the early church, communion is practiced every Sunday. The bread and cup are one part of the entire eucharist service which also includes a reminder of the gospel and a call to repent of sins and reconcile with other church members. As baptism is the physical sign that a believer joins in Christ's death and resurrection and commits to the local church, so communion memorializes Christ's death and reconfirms one's commitment to the church body.

"Talked with" is from the Greek root word dialegomai. It means that Paul has a discussion with them, reasoning back and forth, instead of just lecturing. The discussion goes long into the night—so long that a young man falls asleep and falls out a window to his death. Paul interrupts the conversation and brings the man back to life. The congregation takes communion, and Paul continues the dialogue until daybreak (Acts 20:8–12).