Acts 12:15 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Acts 12:15, NIV: "You're out of your mind,' they told her. When she kept insisting that it was so, they said, 'It must be his angel.'"

Acts 12:15, ESV: "They said to her, “You are out of your mind.” But she kept insisting that it was so, and they kept saying, “It is his angel!”"

Acts 12:15, KJV: "And they said unto her, Thou art mad. But she constantly affirmed that it was even so. Then said they, It is his angel."

Acts 12:15, NASB: "They said to her, 'You are out of your mind!' But she kept insisting that it was so. They kept saying, 'It is his angel.'"

Acts 12:15, NLT: "'You're out of your mind!' they said. When she insisted, they decided, 'It must be his angel.'"

Acts 12:15, CSB: ""You're out of your mind!" they told her. But she kept insisting that it was true, and they said, "It's his angel.""

What does Acts 12:15 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

A group of Christians in Jerusalem have been fervently praying for Peter in the home of Mary, the mother of John Mark. They had no chance but to stand by and watch as Herod Agrippa I ordered the arrest and beheading of the apostle James—the first apostle to die and only one whose death is explicitly recorded in Scripture. When Agrippa realized the execution pleased the members of the Sanhedrin, he made plans to arrest and kill Peter, as well. On the night after the last day of the weeklong Feast of Unleavened Bread, Agrippa scheduled Peter's death. But God sent an angel who released Peter from his chains and led him out of the prison (Acts 12:1–11).

Peter is now at the home of Mary, the probable owner of the upper room where Jesus held the Last Supper and/or the place the first members of the church stayed and received the Holy Spirit. Actually, Peter's on the threshold of Mary's gate. Her servant girl, Rhoda, answered Peter's knock and became so excited she ran to tell the others before letting Peter in (Acts 12:12–14). The group doesn't believe her, however. They think she's out of her mind and it's Peter's "angel" at the gate. Jews believed one's guardian angel looked like their charge. It's unclear why they wouldn't be eager to go and speak with the angel.