2 Corinthians 7:12 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

2 Corinthians 7:12, NIV: So even though I wrote to you, it was neither on account of the one who did the wrong nor on account of the injured party, but rather that before God you could see for yourselves how devoted to us you are.

2 Corinthians 7:12, ESV: So although I wrote to you, it was not for the sake of the one who did the wrong, nor for the sake of the one who suffered the wrong, but in order that your earnestness for us might be revealed to you in the sight of God.

2 Corinthians 7:12, KJV: Wherefore, though I wrote unto you, I did it not for his cause that had done the wrong, nor for his cause that suffered wrong, but that our care for you in the sight of God might appear unto you.

2 Corinthians 7:12, NASB: So although I wrote to you, it was not for the sake of the offender nor for the sake of the one offended, but that your earnestness in our behalf might be made known to you in the sight of God.

2 Corinthians 7:12, NLT: My purpose, then, was not to write about who did the wrong or who was wronged. I wrote to you so that in the sight of God you could see for yourselves how loyal you are to us.

2 Corinthians 7:12, CSB: So even though I wrote to you, it was not because of the one who did wrong, or because of the one who was wronged, but in order that your devotion to us might be made plain to you in the sight of God.

What does 2 Corinthians 7:12 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This passage continues to describe how the Corinthians responded to a severe letter from Paul. The text of that letter is lost, but we get enough detail in 2 Corinthians to understand the scenario. The letter rebuked the Corinthian church for siding with—or not responding to—one among them who had drastically opposed Paul. He instructed them to discipline the man. Paul's letter brought them grief, which led to repentance. In the previous verse, he praised them for punishing the man, but also for their eagerness to make things right.

Now Paul clarifies his reason for writing the letter. It was not for the sake of the man who opposed him. Nor was it for himself as some victim of the man's opposition. Paul wrote the letter to help the Corinthians to see more clearly how earnest they were to be in a good relationship with Paul. Paul wanted them to know this about themselves in the sight of God. Paul insists that his concern for the Corinthians, above all other reasons, is what motivated him to write his severe letter.

Sometimes a strong rebuke is required to help us clarify what matters most to us. The Corinthians confirmed something from Paul's rebuke and their repentance. They established that maintaining their connection to Paul—and Paul's connection to God—mattered far more than avoiding discipline of one among them who opposed Paul, and, thus, opposed God.