2 Corinthians 7:11 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

2 Corinthians 7:11, NIV: See what this godly sorrow has produced in you: what earnestness, what eagerness to clear yourselves, what indignation, what alarm, what longing, what concern, what readiness to see justice done. At every point you have proved yourselves to be innocent in this matter.

2 Corinthians 7:11, ESV: For see what earnestness this godly grief has produced in you, but also what eagerness to clear yourselves, what indignation, what fear, what longing, what zeal, what punishment! At every point you have proved yourselves innocent in the matter.

2 Corinthians 7:11, KJV: For behold this selfsame thing, that ye sorrowed after a godly sort, what carefulness it wrought in you, yea, what clearing of yourselves, yea, what indignation, yea, what fear, yea, what vehement desire, yea, what zeal, yea, what revenge! In all things ye have approved yourselves to be clear in this matter.

2 Corinthians 7:11, NASB: For behold what earnestness this very thing, this godly sorrow, has produced in you: what vindication of yourselves, what indignation, what fear, what longing, what zeal, what punishment of wrong! In everything you demonstrated yourselves to be innocent in the matter.

2 Corinthians 7:11, NLT: Just see what this godly sorrow produced in you! Such earnestness, such concern to clear yourselves, such indignation, such alarm, such longing to see me, such zeal, and such a readiness to punish wrong. You showed that you have done everything necessary to make things right.

2 Corinthians 7:11, CSB: For consider how much diligence this very thing--this grieving as God wills--has produced in you: what a desire to clear yourselves, what indignation, what fear, what deep longing, what zeal, what justice! In every way you showed yourselves to be pure in this matter.

What does 2 Corinthians 7:11 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Somewhere between the writing of what we now call "1 Corinthians" and "2 Corinthians," Paul composed a severe letter to the same church, which is now lost. In it, he apparently rebuked them for not dealing with at least one person among them who stood against Paul during his last visit with them. He instructed them to hold this person accountable, which they have now done (2 Corinthians 2:6). Paul has received news from Titus, who delivered the letter, that they have experienced great sorrow over their sinful lack of response to this man and have repented. Paul called this sorrow they felt the "godly grief" that brings about repentance.

He now points to some other things this sorrow has caused. The Corinthians have reacted to it with an earnestness and eagerness to clear themselves by making things right. They have responded with indignation towards Paul's opponent. They have expressed "fear, which in this context is reverence for God and or respect for His punishment.

The Corinthians have expressed longing for Paul, enthusiasm instead of passiveness, and loving punishment of Paul's sinful opponent. Paul declares that in all these ways, they have proved themselves innocent.

It's not exactly clear how Paul means they had proved "innocent" if, in fact, it was a sense of guilt which brought them to sorrow and the repentance that followed. Most likely, Paul means they have re-established their innocent standing now that they have dealt with the sins which made them guilty.