1 Peter 4:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

1 Peter 4:1, NIV: "Therefore, since Christ suffered in his body, arm yourselves also with the same attitude, because whoever suffers in the body is done with sin."

1 Peter 4:1, ESV: "Since therefore Christ suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves with the same way of thinking, for whoever has suffered in the flesh has ceased from sin,"

1 Peter 4:1, KJV: "Forasmuch then as Christ hath suffered for us in the flesh, arm yourselves likewise with the same mind: for he that hath suffered in the flesh hath ceased from sin;"

1 Peter 4:1, NASB: "Therefore, since Christ has suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same purpose, because he who has suffered in the flesh has ceased from sin,"

1 Peter 4:1, NLT: "So then, since Christ suffered physical pain, you must arm yourselves with the same attitude he had, and be ready to suffer, too. For if you have suffered physically for Christ, you have finished with sin."

1 Peter 4:1, CSB: "Therefore, since Christ suffered in the flesh, arm yourselves also with the same understanding--because the one who suffers in the flesh is finished with sin--"

What does 1 Peter 4:1 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

As Peter has emphasized throughout this letter, Christians should expect to experience suffering in this life. We follow Christ, and He suffered enormously. In fact, it was part of His purpose, part of His mission on earth. If we follow Him and continue His mission, we should expect hardships, as well.

Peter writes that Christians should arm themselves with the same attitude toward suffering that Jesus carried. And what was His attitude? He understood that suffering was built into His purpose here on earth, so He expected it. As a result, He was not surprised when hardship came, and didn't run from it. As Christians, if we are not prepared to suffer for Christ, and as Christ did, we will be surprised when difficult times come. We may feel betrayed. We may be tempted to run away from the purpose God has called us to. We won't be armed with a Christ-like attitude (John 16:1–4).

The reference to "ceasing from sin" can lead to some confusion. Peter's idea here seems to be that walking a path of Christ-like suffering prevents following the opposite path, which leads through indulging in sin. It's not that Christians who suffer, or who are prepared to suffer for Christ, have become sinless and perfect. We have not. We will still make sinful choices. But we have certainly set the course of our lives away from the comfort, escape, and pleasures of sin and toward the readiness to be uncomfortable, to experience hard things, for the sake of Jesus.

It is also true, as Paul wrote in Romans 6:8–11, that those who have trusted in Christ for salvation have died with Him, in a spiritual sense, and have been raised to a new life in which we are free from sin's power over us.