1 Peter 3:10 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

1 Peter 3:10, NIV: For, 'Whoever would love life and see good days must keep their tongue from evil and their lips from deceitful speech.

1 Peter 3:10, ESV: For “Whoever desires to love life and see good days, let him keep his tongue from evil and his lips from speaking deceit;

1 Peter 3:10, KJV: For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile:

1 Peter 3:10, NASB: For, 'THE ONE WHO DESIRES LIFE, TO LOVE AND SEE GOOD DAYS, MUST KEEP HIS TONGUE FROM EVIL AND HIS LIPS FROM SPEAKING DECEIT.

1 Peter 3:10, NLT: For the Scriptures say, 'If you want to enjoy life and see many happy days, keep your tongue from speaking evil and your lips from telling lies.

1 Peter 3:10, CSB: For the one who wants to love lifeand to see good days,let him keep his tongue from eviland his lips from speaking deceit,

What does 1 Peter 3:10 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

In the previous two verses, Peter has called on Christians both to live in harmony together and to refuse to seek revenge. Even when insulted or treated with evilness, this is simply not an acceptable option for the believer. In fact, God commands Christians to give a blessing in exchange for evil treatment.

In verses 10 through 12, Peter furthers his case by referencing Psalm 34:12–16. David's words from the Old Testament still hold true. Those who want to love life and see good days should make some very specific choices about how they live today. Is Peter saying that if we live as he is about to describe, we will love our lives and see good days on this side of heaven? Or is he referring only to the promise of "good days" in the life to come? Probably both are true to a point.

Writing in Psalms, David was making a wisdom statement: a general principle. His claim was that making these particular choices tends to lead to more and better days in this life. Peter affirms David's statement, in the context of his own train of thought. Christians who live this way will make the most of this life and receive rewards in the life to come.

So, what choices can we make, which will lead to such life-loving good days? It's all about what we as Christians refuse to do and what we insist on doing. First, we refuse to allow ourselves to speak evil or to be deceitful with our words. Peter probably means this in the context of getting even with those who speak evil and lie against us. God calls Christians to take those options off the table. We must refuse to use our words to harm, no matter how great the temptation.

Peter continues this thought, and his reference to the Psalms, in the next two verses.