1 Corinthians 15:27 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

1 Corinthians 15:27, NIV: For he 'has put everything under his feet.' Now when it says that 'everything' has been put under him, it is clear that this does not include God himself, who put everything under Christ.

1 Corinthians 15:27, ESV: For “God has put all things in subjection under his feet.” But when it says, “all things are put in subjection,” it is plain that he is excepted who put all things in subjection under him.

1 Corinthians 15:27, KJV: For he hath put all things under his feet. But when he saith, all things are put under him, it is manifest that he is excepted, which did put all things under him.

1 Corinthians 15:27, NASB: For HE HAS PUT ALL THINGS IN SUBJECTION UNDER HIS FEET. But when He says, 'All things are put in subjection,' it is clear that this excludes the Father who put all things in subjection to Him.

1 Corinthians 15:27, NLT: For the Scriptures say, 'God has put all things under his authority.' (Of course, when it says 'all things are under his authority,' that does not include God himself, who gave Christ his authority.)

1 Corinthians 15:27, CSB: For God has put everything under his feet. Now when it says "everything" is put under him, it is obvious that he who puts everything under him is the exception.

What does 1 Corinthians 15:27 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul follows his common pattern of quoting from the Scriptures to support his teaching. In this case, he seems to quote from Psalm 8:6. Much of Paul's writing explains how Jesus' work was planned and foretold by God (1 Corinthians 15:3–4; Romans 16:26; Galatians 3:8). In this case, his point is that God's plan has always been to put all things under the authority of Jesus' feet. This means everything, one day, will be fully submissive to Christ.

Paul has been walking through a series of logical steps. This would have been much appreciated by the people of Corinth, living in a Greco-Roman culture that prized such reasoning. To set aside an obvious criticism, he adds a note to make it clear that "all things" does not include God the Father Himself. Obviously, that's not part of what Paul means by these statements: "it is plain." Instead, it is the Father's power that will enable Christ to gain the victory, followed by Christ's giving to the Father the glory of the conquered kingdom.