Revelation 13:11 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Revelation 13:11, NIV: Then I saw a second beast, coming out of the earth. It had two horns like a lamb, but it spoke like a dragon.

Revelation 13:11, ESV: Then I saw another beast rising out of the earth. It had two horns like a lamb and it spoke like a dragon.

Revelation 13:11, KJV: And I beheld another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb, and he spake as a dragon.

Revelation 13:11, NASB: Then I saw another beast coming up out of the earth; and he had two horns like a lamb, and he spoke as a dragon.

Revelation 13:11, NLT: Then I saw another beast come up out of the earth. He had two horns like those of a lamb, but he spoke with the voice of a dragon.

Revelation 13:11, CSB: Then I saw another beast coming up out of the earth; it had two horns like a lamb, but it spoke like a dragon.

What does Revelation 13:11 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

John saw another beast. This second beast is the seventh dominant character described in this part of Revelation. It had two horns like a lamb and it spoke like a dragon. This beast was rising from the earth. Many understand this to be a reference to Israel, because this beast sets up an idol in the temple (Matthew 24:15; Revelation 13:14–15). Whereas the first beast rises up from the Gentile world, the second beast emerges from Israel and poses as a lamb. By this interpretation, the second beast is apparently a Jew who may present himself as Israel's messiah, although he is a false messiah whose speech is Satanic. He deceives his followers.

Many Bible teachers, if not most, view the first beast, the beast from the sea, as the "Antichrist." Still, it's in keeping with Scripture to call this second beast the Antichrist. However, neither beast is specifically named "the Antichrist" in the book of Revelation. So, this designation is not crucial, and no one should be dogmatic about identifying any specific figure using that exact term. The word "antichrist," can mean both "against Christ" and "in the stead of Christ."

Both beasts are opposed to Christ, but the second beast appears to assume the role of Christ, the Lamb of God. Further, every mention of "antichrist" in the New Testament refers to him in a religious context, not a political context (see 1 John 4:1, 3, 6; 2 John 1:7).