Philippians 1:18 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Philippians 1:18, NIV: But what does it matter? The important thing is that in every way, whether from false motives or true, Christ is preached. And because of this I rejoice. Yes, and I will continue to rejoice,

Philippians 1:18, ESV: What then? Only that in every way, whether in pretense or in truth, Christ is proclaimed, and in that I rejoice. Yes, and I will rejoice,

Philippians 1:18, KJV: What then? notwithstanding, every way, whether in pretence, or in truth, Christ is preached; and I therein do rejoice, yea, and will rejoice.

Philippians 1:18, NASB: What then? Only that in every way, whether in pretense or in truth, Christ is proclaimed, and in this I rejoice. But not only that, I also will rejoice,

Philippians 1:18, NLT: But that doesn't matter. Whether their motives are false or genuine, the message about Christ is being preached either way, so I rejoice. And I will continue to rejoice.

Philippians 1:18, CSB: What does it matter? Only that in every way, whether from false motives or true, Christ is proclaimed, and in this I rejoice. Yes, and I will continue to rejoice

What does Philippians 1:18 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul rounds out his comments on those who preach for selfish reasons with a very practical conclusion: so what? Paul was happy to see Christ proclaimed regardless of the reason. In the end, his goal was to help every person possible to hear the good news and receive it. Those who thought they were hurting Paul by repeating his preaching, or by spreading his claims, were actually giving him his very heart's desire.

In Romans 15:20–21, Paul noted one of his goals was to take the gospel to people who had yet to hear it: "I make it my ambition to preach the gospel, not where Christ has already been named, lest I build on someone else's foundation, but as it is written, ‘Those who have never been told of him will see, and those who have never heard will understand.'" His greatest desire in ministry was to get the gospel out to new people. It only makes sense that he would ultimately conclude the spread of the gospel in Rome was positive, regardless of the motivations involved.