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Mark 6:14

ESV King Herod heard of it, for Jesus’ name had become known. Some said, “John the Baptist has been raised from the dead. That is why these miraculous powers are at work in him.”
NIV King Herod heard about this, for Jesus' name had become well known. Some were saying, 'John the Baptist has been raised from the dead, and that is why miraculous powers are at work in him.'
NASB And King Herod heard about it, for His name had become well known; and people were saying, 'John the Baptist has risen from the dead, and that is why these miraculous powers are at work in Him.'
CSB King Herod heard about it, because Jesus's name had become well known. Some said, "John the Baptist has been raised from the dead, and that's why miraculous powers are at work in him."
NLT Herod Antipas, the king, soon heard about Jesus, because everyone was talking about him. Some were saying, 'This must be John the Baptist raised from the dead. That is why he can do such miracles.'
KJV And king Herod heard of him; (for his name was spread abroad:) and he said, That John the Baptist was risen from the dead, and therefore mighty works do shew forth themselves in him.

What does Mark 6:14 mean?

Herod Antipas has heard of Jesus' ministry and the missions trip of His disciples. He and his court are confused because this message sounds very much like that of John the Baptist, whom Herod arrested shortly before Jesus started His ministry (Mark 1:14) and executed some time later.

Antipas is the son of Herod the Great and Malthace. Herod the Great was of Edomite descent, and Malthace was a Samaritan. At that time, the Jewish people disliked both nationalities. The fact that Herod's family was installed into their leadership by Rome doesn't help. After Herod the Great's death, Rome splits his kingdom into four "tetrarchs." Antipas rules over Galilee, north of Samaria and west of the Sea of Galilee, and Perea, east of Judea. His brother Archelaus rules Judea, and his half-brother Philip rules the area east of Galilee and north of Decapolis. Herod the Great's sister, Salome I, rules small sections around Judea.

"Herod" is both a term for "king" and somewhat of a family name. Although Antipas is identified as "Herod," he has assumed the kingship, and Emperor Augustus calls him "Antipas Tetrarch." It is unclear if Mark uses the title because of custom or out of sarcasm. Matthew splits the difference and uses "Herod the tetrarch" (Matthew 14:1).

John the Baptist preaches in Judea, across the Jordan River from Perea, and Antipas becomes familiar with his message of repentance. Antipas' followers conspire with the Pharisees from Jerusalem to destroy Jesus (Mark 3:6), although there is no indication Antipas knows. It is Antipas who meets with Jesus before the crucifixion. Luke 23:7 states Pilate learns Jesus belongs to "Herod's" jurisdiction and that "Herod" happens to be in Jerusalem at the time. Although silent during the interrogation (Luke 23:9), Jesus considers Antipas a "reed shaken by the wind" (Matthew 11:7) and a fox (Luke 13:32).
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