Mark 10:32 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Mark 10:32, NIV: They were on their way up to Jerusalem, with Jesus leading the way, and the disciples were astonished, while those who followed were afraid. Again he took the Twelve aside and told them what was going to happen to him.

Mark 10:32, ESV: And they were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them. And they were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. And taking the twelve again, he began to tell them what was to happen to him,

Mark 10:32, KJV: And they were in the way going up to Jerusalem; and Jesus went before them: and they were amazed; and as they followed, they were afraid. And he took again the twelve, and began to tell them what things should happen unto him,

Mark 10:32, NASB: Now they were on the road going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking on ahead of them; and they were amazed, and those who followed were fearful. And again He took the twelve aside and began to tell them what was going to happen to Him,

Mark 10:32, NLT: They were now on the way up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them. The disciples were filled with awe, and the people following behind were overwhelmed with fear. Taking the twelve disciples aside, Jesus once more began to describe everything that was about to happen to him.

Mark 10:32, CSB: They were on the road, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus was walking ahead of them. The disciples were astonished, but those who followed him were afraid. Taking the Twelve aside again, he began to tell them the things that would happen to him.

What does Mark 10:32 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Each Gospel writer focused on a different set of details. Based on information given in Matthew, Luke, and John, we know quite a bit happened between Mark chapters 9 and 10. Included in that time frame are an attempt by the Pharisees, chief priests, and temple guards to arrest Jesus (John 7:32–52), an attempt by the Jewish leadership to stone Him (John 8:58–59), yet another attempt to either stone or arrest Him (John 10:22–39), and the decision of the Sanhedrin to figure out a way to kill Him (John 11:45–54). Even Herod Antipas wants to kill Jesus, although vaguely and without much effort as was his reputation (Luke 13:31). In addition, Jesus tells the Jewish leadership their father is Satan (John 8:44) and some of them counter by claiming Jesus is possessed (John 10:21).

So, it's no surprise that Jesus' followers would be afraid as they walk toward Jerusalem. The wording, however, leaves us confused as to who "they"—the fearful followers—are. They may be the Twelve, trailing behind Jesus as is appropriate for disciples. But they may be other disciples following the Twelve. While Jesus had warned the disciples before that He will be killed (Mark 8:31–33; 9:30–32), this is the first time He notes the location. Combining this with the threats that have been building against Jesus, all of Jesus' followers have reason to be afraid.

Jesus shows resolve, not fear. The night before the crucifixion, resolve will combine with anguish (Mark 14:34–38). Many people wonder why Jesus agonizes over the crucifixion if He knows He will come through it alive and glorified. Certainly, the knowledge that His sacrifice will be accepted by God and cover the sins of millions gives Him the courage to walk to Jerusalem. But He knows what is coming (Mark 10:33–34). No sane person would face mocking, spitting, flogging, and death by crucifixion without dread. Even worse than the physical pain, the betrayal by His friend Judas, and the rejection by His creation, Jesus must watch His Father turn away, abandoning Him to the sins of the world (Mark 15:33–39).