Judges 7:1 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Judges 7:1, NIV: Early in the morning, Jerub-Baal (that is, Gideon) and all his men camped at the spring of Harod. The camp of Midian was north of them in the valley near the hill of Moreh.

Judges 7:1, ESV: Then Jerubbaal (that is, Gideon) and all the people who were with him rose early and encamped beside the spring of Harod. And the camp of Midian was north of them, by the hill of Moreh, in the valley.

Judges 7:1, KJV: Then Jerubbaal, who is Gideon, and all the people that were with him, rose up early, and pitched beside the well of Harod: so that the host of the Midianites were on the north side of them, by the hill of Moreh, in the valley.

Judges 7:1, NASB: Then Jerubbaal (that is, Gideon) and all the people who were with him got up early, and camped beside the spring of Harod; and the camp of Midian was on the north side of them by the hill of Moreh in the valley.

Judges 7:1, NLT: So Jerub-baal (that is, Gideon) and his army got up early and went as far as the spring of Harod. The armies of Midian were camped north of them in the valley near the hill of Moreh.

Judges 7:1, CSB: Jerubbaal (that is, Gideon) and all the troops who were with him, got up early and camped beside the spring of Harod. The camp of Midian was north of them, below the hill of Moreh, in the valley.

What does Judges 7:1 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

When God called Gideon, he was hiding food from the enemy (Judges 6:11–12). Even when God confirmed His divine message (Judges 6:17–22), Gideon was still hesitant. After being empowered by the Holy Spirit to summon an army, he still asked for signs and proofs (Judges 6:34–40). Finally, after so many confirmations, Gideon seems ready to attack the Midianites.

The enemy is camped in the Valley of Jezreel by the hill of Moreh (Judges 6:33). This puts them squarely between Mount Gilboa to the south and Mount Tabor to the north. They are not far from the location at which Gideon's hometown of Ophrah is most commonly thought to have been. The Midian army, together with their allies, is enormous (Judges 8:10).

This verse briefly refers to Gideon by his new name: Jerubbaal. This title came after Gideon destroyed a pagan altar, and his father challenged the town to let Baal defend himself if he so chose. The name Jerubbaal means "let Baal contend," and suggests that Gideon's very life and success are proof of the Canaanite god's weakness.

Gideon and those with him rise early in the morning and head out to set up their own camp by the spring of Harod. This puts them directly south of the Midianite army and only about five miles, or eight kilometers, away. Gideon has a large company of men under his command at this point (Judges 7:3), though not for long. God has plans to winnow the group down to a small task force.