Judges 16:28 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Judges 16:28, NIV: Then Samson prayed to the LORD, 'Sovereign LORD, remember me. Please, God, strengthen me just once more, and let me with one blow get revenge on the Philistines for my two eyes.'

Judges 16:28, ESV: Then Samson called to the LORD and said, “O Lord GOD, please remember me and please strengthen me only this once, O God, that I may be avenged on the Philistines for my two eyes.”

Judges 16:28, KJV: And Samson called unto the LORD, and said, O Lord GOD, remember me, I pray thee, and strengthen me, I pray thee, only this once, O God, that I may be at once avenged of the Philistines for my two eyes.

Judges 16:28, NASB: Then Samson called to the LORD and said, 'Lord GOD, please remember me and please strengthen me just this time, O God, that I may at once take vengeance on the Philistines for my two eyes.'

Judges 16:28, NLT: Then Samson prayed to the LORD, 'Sovereign LORD, remember me again. O God, please strengthen me just one more time. With one blow let me pay back the Philistines for the loss of my two eyes.'

Judges 16:28, CSB: He called out to the Lord, "Lord God, please remember me. Strengthen me, God, just once more. With one act of vengeance, let me pay back the Philistines for my two eyes."

What does Judges 16:28 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

This is only the second time in Samson's recorded story where he addressed the Lord. The first took place after he killed a swarm of Philistine soldiers with the jawbone of a donkey. He gave God credit for the victory, mostly, only to demand water for his thirst with a haughty accusation that the Lord might let him die (Judges 15:14–18). Here, completely humiliated (Judges 16:21, 25), Samson calls to the Lord again.

Samson's prayer now carries much greater respect, referring to his Creator as "O Lord GOD." The Hebrew phrasing is Adōna' y yhwh, using two of the more common references to God. Samson also includes the word "please," asking the Lord to grant him supernatural power one last more time.

At the same time, Samson's prayer also expresses the primary motive for his actions: revenge. This deliverer, this judge of Israel (Judges 2:16–19) set aside to begin to save his people from the Philistines (Judges 13:5; 14:4), was always motivated by personal vendetta more than anything else. The Lord is still willing and able to use Samson, even Samson's bitterness and selfishness, to accomplish the purpose for which Samson was born.