Judges 15:19 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Judges 15:19, NIV: Then God opened up the hollow place in Lehi, and water came out of it. When Samson drank, his strength returned and he revived. So the spring was called En Hakkore, and it is still there in Lehi.

Judges 15:19, ESV: And God split open the hollow place that is at Lehi, and water came out from it. And when he drank, his spirit returned, and he revived. Therefore the name of it was called En-hakkore; it is at Lehi to this day.

Judges 15:19, KJV: But God clave an hollow place that was in the jaw, and there came water thereout; and when he had drunk, his spirit came again, and he revived: wherefore he called the name thereof Enhakkore, which is in Lehi unto this day.

Judges 15:19, NASB: But God split the hollow place that is in Lehi so that water came out of it. When he drank, his strength returned and he revived. Therefore he named it En-hakkore, which is in Lehi to this day.

Judges 15:19, NLT: So God caused water to gush out of a hollow in the ground at Lehi, and Samson was revived as he drank. Then he named that place 'The Spring of the One Who Cried Out,' and it is still in Lehi to this day.

Judges 15:19, CSB: So God split a hollow place in the ground at Lehi, and water came out of it. After Samson drank, his strength returned, and he revived. That is why he named it Hakkore Spring, which is still in Lehi today.

What does Judges 15:19 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

That Samson did not die in this incident is truly miraculous. Empowered by God's Spirit, he wiped out an entire Philistine army with nothing more than the jawbone of a donkey. It's not surprising that he'd be intensely thirsty after such an ordeal—so much so that he thought he'd die. That led to Samson's first recorded prayer, though it was demanding and accusatory towards God (Judges 15:14–18). That said, Samson at least gave the Lord credit for the victory and humbled himself just enough to make the request.

The Lord responds to Samson's request immediately. He splits open a nearby rock, which gushes water. Samson drinks and is revived. God graciously gives Samson what he asks, despite Samson's pride and selfishness.

The new spring is later called "En-hakkore," which literally means "the spring of him who called." The Bible does not explicitly say if Samson decided on this name. His initial celebration of victory was self-centered, so it wouldn't be shocking to know he'd named the location of this miracle after himself. Those in Israel reading this book closer to the time of Samson would likely have known about the spring at the place called Lehi. The term Lehi, itself, means "jawbone," likely a name given because of the events of this chapter.