Exodus 1:7 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

Exodus 1:7, NIV: "but the Israelites were exceedingly fruitful; they multiplied greatly, increased in numbers and became so numerous that the land was filled with them."

Exodus 1:7, ESV: "But the people of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly; they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong, so that the land was filled with them."

Exodus 1:7, KJV: "And the children of Israel were fruitful, and increased abundantly, and multiplied, and waxed exceeding mighty; and the land was filled with them."

Exodus 1:7, NASB: "But the sons of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly, and multiplied, and became exceedingly mighty, so that the land was filled with them."

Exodus 1:7, NLT: "But their descendants, the Israelites, had many children and grandchildren. In fact, they multiplied so greatly that they became extremely powerful and filled the land."

Exodus 1:7, CSB: "But the Israelites were fruitful, increased rapidly, multiplied, and became extremely numerous so that the land was filled with them."

What does Exodus 1:7 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

In contrast with the first generation of Jacob's family that numbered seventy people (Exodus 1:5), the Israelites were now "fruitful and increased greatly." This was a continuation of God's command to Adam, to Noah, and to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. Joseph would be used to bring the sons of Jacob to Egypt where they would become a nation. Moses would then be the man God would use to bring them back to the land He had promised to give to Abraham and his descendants forever.

Further details are also added to describe the numerical growth of the Jewish people. They "multiplied and grew exceedingly strong," noting God's blessing upon the bearing of many children among the Israelites. The result was "the land was filled with them," offering a picture of a densely populated area of Goshen. For the people if Israel to simply live there was tolerable. But, once the non-Egyptian population grew to such a size, their potential power threatened the neighboring Egyptians. This uneasy situation serves as the backdrop for Pharaoh's harsh treatment of the Jews.