2 Peter 1:11 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

2 Peter 1:11, NIV: and you will receive a rich welcome into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

2 Peter 1:11, ESV: For in this way there will be richly provided for you an entrance into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

2 Peter 1:11, KJV: For so an entrance shall be ministered unto you abundantly into the everlasting kingdom of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

2 Peter 1:11, NASB: for in this way the entrance into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ will be abundantly supplied to you.

2 Peter 1:11, NLT: Then God will give you a grand entrance into the eternal Kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

2 Peter 1:11, CSB: For in this way, entry into the eternal kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ will be richly provided for you.

What does 2 Peter 1:11 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Believers are offered more than just the rewards of heaven. Those who trust Christ for salvation will be richly provided with an entrance to the kingdom of Jesus. Those same believers are also given the chance at living abundantly, in the Christlike qualities of goodness listed in verses 5 through 7.

Scholars and traditions vary in interpreting this verse. Some take this to mean that those who exercise the qualities of Jesus will be more richly welcomed in heaven. That is, there will be extra rewards for those with more faithful lives than those Christians who did not have as much success. Others read Peter's words to mean that those who do not possess those qualities were not Christians—at all—and will not be welcomed into the kingdom of Jesus—at all.

Still another group claims Peter is saying that those who don't exercise the listed qualities of Jesus' goodness may have entered into the front door of Christianity at one point. But—as the claim goes—these people walked away from faith in Jesus and will therefore be unwelcome in His kingdom. Of course, the idea that such people were ever truly saved seems unlikely in light of 1 Peter 1:3–5.

The first interpretation seems the most likely, and the most consistent with the rest of the New Testament text. The second is strained in light of the fact that Christians are still capable of sin and failure, and our works do not maintain our salvation. The third idea's acceptance hinges quite a bit on what "acceptance" means: salvation, or reward?

Whichever reading is best, we're left with a thrilling picture. This is the opportunity to be warmly welcomed by Christ as we finish our work on earth and enter into his kingdom. Every Christian should be motivated by that moment, and continue to exercise the qualities of Jesus which have been made available to us in the here and now.