2 Corinthians 13:8 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

2 Corinthians 13:8, NIV: For we cannot do anything against the truth, but only for the truth.

2 Corinthians 13:8, ESV: For we cannot do anything against the truth, but only for the truth.

2 Corinthians 13:8, KJV: For we can do nothing against the truth, but for the truth.

2 Corinthians 13:8, NASB: For we cannot do anything against the truth, but only for the truth.

2 Corinthians 13:8, NLT: For we cannot oppose the truth, but must always stand for the truth.

2 Corinthians 13:8, CSB: For we can't do anything against the truth, but only for the truth.

What does 2 Corinthians 13:8 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Paul and his associates prayed to God that the Corinthians would not do wrong (2 Corinthians 13:7). He wants them to repent from any ongoing sin in their lives and turn back to true devotion to Christ. Doing so would be evidence of legitimate faith in Jesus and proof of his true standing as an apostle of Christ. If they believe in the true gospel, then the one who introduced them to Christ must also be true in his teachings.

However, he is not primarily concerned with appearance. The main issue for Paul is not how their good behavior makes him look to the outside world. He wants them to do what is right because it is right, because it is the best for them. And, because that will encourage Paul to know they really are faithful.

He adds that he and his co-workers cannot change their presentation of the gospel in order to look good in the eyes of others. They cannot—will not—do anything contrary to the truth. Jesus declared Himself to be the truth (John 14:6). So, in serving Christ, they serve the truth in all cases all the time, whether it fits into cultural norms or the expectations of others.

The following verse shows that Paul has accepted his limitations. He freely admits he is weak in some of the ways his opponents have described him. Those assessments are true—but those specific weaknesses are what make Christ's power so evident in Paul's ministry. Paul and his associates prayed to God that the Corinthians would not do wrong (2 Corinthians 13:7). He wants them to repent from any ongoing sin in their lives and turn back to true devotion to Christ. Doing so would be evidence of legitimate faith in Jesus and proof of his true standing as an apostle of Christ. If they believe in the true gospel, then the one who introduced them to Christ must also be true in his teachings.

However, he is not primarily concerned with appearance. The main issue for Paul is not how their good behavior makes him look to the outside world. He wants them to do what is right because it is right, because it is the best for them. And, because that will encourage Paul to know they really are faithful.

He adds that he and his co-workers cannot change their presentation of the gospel in order to look good in the eyes of others. They cannot—will not—do anything contrary to the truth. Jesus declared Himself to be the truth (John 14:6). So, in serving Christ, they serve the truth in all cases all the time, whether it fits into cultural norms or the expectations of others.

The following verse shows that Paul has accepted his limitations. He freely admits he is weak in some of the ways his opponents have described him. Those assessments are true—but those specific weaknesses are what make Christ's power so evident in Paul's ministry.