2 Corinthians 10:14 Parallel Verses [⇓ See commentary ⇓]

2 Corinthians 10:14, NIV: We are not going too far in our boasting, as would be the case if we had not come to you, for we did get as far as you with the gospel of Christ.

2 Corinthians 10:14, ESV: For we are not overextending ourselves, as though we did not reach you. For we were the first to come all the way to you with the gospel of Christ.

2 Corinthians 10:14, KJV: For we stretch not ourselves beyond our measure, as though we reached not unto you: for we are come as far as to you also in preaching the gospel of Christ:

2 Corinthians 10:14, NASB: For we are not overextending ourselves, as if we did not reach to you, for we were the first to come even as far as you in the gospel of Christ;

2 Corinthians 10:14, NLT: We are not reaching beyond these boundaries when we claim authority over you, as if we had never visited you. For we were the first to travel all the way to Corinth with the Good News of Christ.

2 Corinthians 10:14, CSB: For we are not overextending ourselves, as if we had not reached you, since we have come to you with the gospel of Christ.

What does 2 Corinthians 10:14 mean? [⇑ See verse text ⇑]

Because his speech is not as impressive as his writing, Paul's critics among the Corinthians have suggested that believers need not worry what Paul may say or do when he arrives. False teachers point to themselves and other polished presenters as more qualified than Paul; such orators are much more successful according to the tastes of the surrounding culture.

Paul has answered that he refused to even participate in the competition they are describing (2 Corinthians 10:13). That pointless exercise involves people comparing themselves to each other, to figure out who is best. Paul does not need to play that game. God has already given him a completely different mission: to reach the Corinthians with the gospel of Christ.

Now Paul adds that he has already succeeded in what God gave him to do. He reached the Corinthians with the good news of salvation through faith in Christ. He does not need to "overextend" himself to try to be successful according to some worldly standard. In other words, he doesn't need to compete. He doesn't need to be the most impressive speaker, nor make the most entertaining arguments in order to win them away from other teachers. He already reached them, and they had already believed. Why would he go back and try to outperform his opponents to get the Corinthians to believe in Christ if they already believed?